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Word and Phrase Origins

Origin of the Phrase 'Written in stone'?

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2009-05-24 08:01:05
2009-05-24 08:01:05

The origin of the phrase "Written in Stone" most likely comes from the Law of Hammurabi which states that the law as written cannot be changed by anyone that follows and it was 'written in stone' so that it could not be changed. Its alternate saying, linked below, is something that is changeable.

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