Animal Rights and Abuse
Research Methodology
Animal Testing

Should animals be used for medical research?

Answer

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Wiki User
08/23/2017

I think that it's wrong since they can do a lot of other things to test medicine. They can make pieces of skin without using real skin. Science has come far and there are alternatives. But it's more expensive so most companies don't want to.

I think it isn't right ,however sometimes it has to be done:(

I am for that. I would want items tested on animals before humans. Animals are not equal to humans. The idea that we can not use them for research is appalling to me. It cheapens the value of us as a species.

Personally I wish it wasn't so, but as far as I know they don't have alternatives other than humans themselves which isn't always permitted.

Personally I feel that people should volunteer to do it despite the risks, as were more capable of communicating pain and side effects, of course some medical research is real raw and would undoubtedly kill but I still belive people would volunteer. I expect theres wide opinion on this question so keep an eye on the discussions board! X

As stated earlier personaly I wish it wasnt done however with that said I can understand that testing af drugs procedures e.t.c gets done with animals. and saves more animals and peoples lives then are lost. However I think it is absolutely wrong for cosmetics and similar vanity rubish to be tested on animals.
Personally I wish it wasn't so, but as far as I know they don't have alternatives other than humans themselves which isn't always permitted.

Personally I feel that people should volunteer to do it despite the risks, as were more capable of communicating pain and side effects, of course some medical research is real raw and would undoubtedly kill but I still belive people would volunteer. I expect theres wide opinion on this question so keep an eye on the discussions board! X As stated earlier personaly I wish it wasnt done however with that said I can understand that testing af drugs procedures e.t.c gets done with animals. and saves more animals and peoples lives then are lost. However I think it is absolutely wrong for cosmetics and similar vanity rubish to be tested on animals.
Animals are used for research for ethical reasons. Animals are first used in medical research so that humans are not harmed. Animals are used in other research to understand their physiology such as why do bears hibernate and how.
No, they should not. Nowadays humans have much greater scientific breakthroughs and research and do not need to still use animal tests as much as they once believed they did. True - as it is, some animal experiments have benefited us and some also have not, e.g. cigarettes were tested on rabbits and were deemed to be safe BUT what the scientists didnt know was that humans are NOT like rabbits and we can't break down nicotine like they can. They can break it down 60 times faster than humans and this dramatically reduces the amount of nicotine Dependent receptors in their brains, meaning they don't get addicted to it any where near as badly as we do. There are many more of those kinds of stories.

Basically, rationality begs the question: why would you do that when it is not always reliable and will probably need human tests anyway?

It is a fact that we would not have most of the medical knowledge we do today if we hadn't done it in the past, but again I see no reason for it to continue other than humans trying to keep their 'control' at what they seem to think is the top of the chain.

Only you can decide whether you agree or not but being informed is necessary for your decision to be right for you.

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Wiki User
01/18/2017

Testing drugs on non-human animals is cruel, unreliable, wasteful, and dangerous.

Non-human animals do not get many of the diseases that humans do, including Parkinson’s disease, major types of heart disease, many types of cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, HIV, and schizophrenia. Only 50% of the DNA responsible for regulating genes in mice could be matched with human DNA. Only one third of substances known to cause cancer in humans have been shown to cause cancer in animals.


Toxicity is different in different species. The most commonly used species of monkey to test drug safety (Cynomolgous macaque monkeys), are resistant to doses of acetaminophen that would be deadly in humans. Chocolate, grapes, raisins, avocados, and macadamia nuts are harmless in people but toxic to dogs. Aspirin is toxic to many animals, including cats, mice, and rats and would not be available to humans if it had been tested per current animal testing standards.


A full 95% of drugs fail in human trials despite promising results in animal tests. Only 19% of dangerous drug side effects could have been predicted by animal tests. Over 115 million animals in experiments globally each year, yet on average only 25 new medicines are approved annually by the leading drug regulator, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Many of these are for rare diseases. Even those drugs that are approved are not universally effective due to individual reactions: the top ten highest-grossing drugs in the USA only help between 1 in 4 and 1 in 25 people who take them. Of over 1,000 potential stroke treatments that had been ‘successful’ in animal tests, only approximately 10% progressed to human trials. None worked sufficiently well in humans.


Vioxx, a drug used to treat arthritis, was found to be safe when tested in monkeys (and five other animal species) but has been estimated to have caused around 320,000 heart attacks and strokes and 140,000 deaths worldwide. A clinical trial of Hepatitis B drug fialuridine had to be stopped because it caused severe liver damage in seven patients, five of whom died. It had been tested on animals first.