answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2014-12-05 18:01:54
2014-12-05 18:01:54

The Supreme Court must have a simple majority to render a decision in a case.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


can another court change the decision of a Supreme Court case


The case is tried in a trial court - If the outcome is not satisfactory to one of the parties to the case, it may appealed to the Court of Appeals. The Appeals Court will review the case and IF THEY WISH TO ACCEPT IT for review, they will consider the case and render a decision on the question contained in the appeal. If that appeal is not satisfactory to one of the parties in the case, that ruling may be appealed, yet again, to the Supreme Court. If the Supreme Court chooses to accept the case, they, too, will hear the case and render a decision. The Supreme Court's decision is the final word and there is no higher appeal.


The decision of the previous appeals court that heard the case is the final decision should the Supreme Court refuse to hear the case.


The decision then remains what it was when appealed to the Supreme Court.



Unless the 'other court' is a later US Supreme Court, no. A court case in the US, once decided on by the Supreme Court, cannot be appealed to any body, so the case is decided. However, the precedent set by a US Supreme court case can be changed by a later US Supreme Court case decision, as was the case when Brown v Board of Education changed the precedent set by Plessy v Ferguson.


Cushing and Moore took no part in the consideration or decision of the case. ... The case resulted from a petition to the Supreme Court by William Marbury, who ... the Supreme Court to force the new Secretary of State James Madison to deliver.


In the Supreme Court, the written decision and legal reasoning for a case is called an Opinion.


It gave the Supreme Court powers not granted by the Constitution


Supreme Court decisions can only be overturned in two ways:The US Supreme Court can overturn a decision on an earlier case by making a contradictory decision on a current case (or by reversing a current decision).Congress and the States can overturn a decision by amending the US Constitution.


The Supreme Court has made many decisions. Provide a case or subject and an answer can be given.


In United States v. Morrison, 529, U.S. 528 (2000), the case was decided by the United States Supreme Court. When the Supreme Court hears a case, there is no jury. The members of the Court itself render the decision. Should need more information, use the link below.


The U.S. Supreme Court reversed the State of New York's decision on this case.


It means the US Supreme Court disagreed with the decision of the state supreme court on that particular case, and sent the case back to the state court with specific instructions on what action needed to be taken to correct the problem.



it gave the supreme court powers not specifically given by the constitution


That depends on the case. Often, the state supreme court is the end of the road for a case, making the decision of the state supreme court final and binding. Sometimes cases involved federal questions (issues arising under the US Constitution or federal law) that allow them to be appealed to the US Supreme Court. If the US Supreme Court hears such a case, it may affirm or overturn the state supreme court decision.


No. The US Supreme Court is the final court of appeal; if they deny your case, the decision of the lower court stands. There is no other avenue of appeal.


"Miranda rights" resulted from a 1966 Supreme Court decision in the case of Miranda v. Arizona.


The US Supreme Court made a decision in the case of Gibbons v. Ogden, (1824). See Related Questions, below, for a discussion of that decision.


The Supreme Court's decision becomes the rule of law, and the case may be remanded (returned) to the lower court for disposition.


Yes, when there is a preserved federal question involved in the state supreme court's decision. Federal questions like the constitutionality of a state law are allowed to be raised and determined in state courts. If the state action goes to the state supreme court, but one party alleges that the state supreme court decision is wrong because it mistakenly interprets the US Constitution or federal statute, the US Supreme Court may, if it chooses, take an appeal from the state supreme court decision.If the state supreme court decision is based entirely on the state constitution or state statute with no issue of a federal nature, then the US Supreme Court has no jurisdiction and may not hear the case.When the case has been decided by the highest state court of appeals (state Supreme Court), involves a question of federal or constitutional law, and a party to the case has petitioned for a Writ of Certiorari from the US Supreme Court.Likewise, if a case on appeal from a state supreme court is denied a writ of certiorari from the US Supreme Court (as happens 98-99% of the time), the decision of the lower court is final.


Yes. Adjudication is the legal process to settle a dispute. It is the act of a court, or other arbiter, to hear and settle a case and render a decision, order, judgment, or decree.Yes. Adjudication is the legal process to settle a dispute. It is the act of a court, or other arbiter, to hear and settle a case and render a decision, order, judgment, or decree.Yes. Adjudication is the legal process to settle a dispute. It is the act of a court, or other arbiter, to hear and settle a case and render a decision, order, judgment, or decree.Yes. Adjudication is the legal process to settle a dispute. It is the act of a court, or other arbiter, to hear and settle a case and render a decision, order, judgment, or decree.


If you are not satisfied with the decision made by the jury, you can appeal your case to a higher court to render a decision based on facts presented in that specific case. Cases are not retried in appellate courts; however, an appellate court may reverse the trial court decision and remand the case for retrial under certain circumstances.


All US Supreme Court decisions require a simple majority vote for a decision. For example, if nine justices hear a case, at least five must agree on a decision.The only court that can overturn a US Supreme Court decision is the Supreme Court itself.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.