Food & Cooking
Pasta
Spaghetti

Too spicy spaghetti sauce - what can be done?

474849

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2015-05-26 19:56:31
2015-05-26 19:56:31
Answer

Dilute the spice by doubling up on the tomatoes, tomato sauce and paste. A touch of brown sugar and a teaspoon or two of baking soda can help reduce both the spice and the acid.


***I've used this many a time -

The best kept secret to improve chili's acidity comes from an idea from Emeril Agasse. If you're making a huge batch like I do, heat in microwave for one minute or on the stove, a quarter cup of apple cider vinegar. Once its hot, stir in two tablespoons of table sugar and dissolve. Add it to the chili and its wonderful. If you get it a hair too sweet, add salt. The mixture is called "gastrique" (gastreek), works wonder in any tomato based sauce. I used in spaghetti sauce last month when my hubby got heavy handed with the cayanne pepper. It worked like a charm, and it did take me a few times. Start slowly, keeping the proportions the same - 1/8 cup vinegar to 1 tbls sugar for example.
Adding milk or cream can usually do the trick

567
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


3 days if you have it for 2 or less than ur fricken screwd


In spaghetti sauce that is too sweet add balsamic vinegar.


add some water to thin it out.


Keep boiling it (without a lid on) until the sauce reduces


I've done that! :( You can try adding other herbs and such to mask it, but garlic is pretty potent. I added more of everything else and wound up with a bigger batch of sauce.


"Spaghetti" actually refers to the shape of the pasta, and in the US "marinara" refers to the sauce. You can use whatever sauce you want on spaghetti, but it's best suited to lighter sauces with not a lot of big chunks, like a simple drizzle of olive oil and crushed garlic, or a carbonara. "Spaghetti" is actually plural for "spaghetto" which translates to "twine" in Italian. In Italy you would say the type of pasta and then mention the sauce too. So the classic spaghetti dish we know in the US would be called "Spaghetti alla marinara".


"Spaghetti" actually refers to the shape of the pasta, and in the US "marinara" refers to the sauce. You can use whatever sauce you want on spaghetti, but it's best suited to lighter sauces with not a lot of big chunks, like a simple drizzle of olive oil and crushed garlic, or a carbonara. "Spaghetti" is actually plural for "spaghetto" which translates to "twine" in Italian. In Italy you would say the type of pasta and then mention the sauce too. So the classic spaghetti dish we know in the US would be called "Spaghetti alla marinara".



pepper red peppers ground beef cheese salt.


Baking Soda is used to neutralize the acidity of the tomatoes in spaghetti sauce. If there was too much baking soda added, you might be able to add a little vinegar or even better a red wine vinegar to raise the acidity of the sauce or add more tomato sauce.



Yes, it is a good idea as this has a lot of flavour in to. You can boil the sauce to evaporate the excess liquid and make the sauce thicker and more concentrated.


Add more tomato sauce. Or add some tomato juice.


Personally, I would try adding sugar go counteract the pepper taste. That, or more tomato sauce to dilute the pepper flavor.


Spaghetti on its own is pretty tasteless, that's why it's usually served with a rich sauce. e.g. bolognese sauce, which is fried garlic, fried onion, fried minced beef and a tin tomato sauce . I know everything is fried but if you use olive oil it's not too bad for you and is very tasty.


Add a little honey. Just until it tastes less spicy.


It depends on whether the problem is the sauce is too spicy or too HOT (as in with chiles). If its a question of too much spice, I'd try to make some more sauce with less spice to dilute it if I could, if that is not possible, I'd try to dilute its spicy effect by adding a starch to the plate, either some white rice or potatoes. If the problem is excessive HEAT, milk is the likely answer. Consumption of milk or sour cream with the spicy food will actually prevent some (though not all) of the chemical that creates the heat from connecting with the appropriate taste buds on your tongue. So the heat is all still there, but your tongue doesn't realize all of it is there.


Add either a splash of red wine, red wine vinegar, or vinegar. A little at a time!


There are a couple of easy ways to fix curry sauce that has turned out too spicy. One is by adding some coconut milk. Add a bit at a time and taste it to check. The other way is to add some fresh lime or lemon juice.


A little ketchup will balance it out. Its best to add all ingredients a little at a time. Learn not to put sugar in spaghetti sauce, tomatoes are naturally sweet. We eat too much sugar in this country, anyway. Peel a large potato and stick in whole. The potato will soak up the sugar (same as putting in too much salt.) Leave in for 15 - 20 minutes and remove potato. If the sauce is on the thick side you can use a little water to thin it down. The above poster is right, you don't need sugar! Get a good recipe for spaghetti sauce with some fresh herbs added instead.


Add a few peeled carrots to the sauce and let them sit in it while it cooks and then add salt a little at a time and keep tasting it until the sweetness seems to be reduced


The soup was too spicy fo me.


It depends, but a good rule of thumb is that the sooner you eat it, the better it tastes, so I wouldn't wait too long.


Yes they are, but not too spicy, it really depends on the molasses you use in your recipe. Mild molasses is sweet and not too spicy, that is the kind I recommend :D


Best way to change the heat level is to add to the sauce. Add non spiced sauce to what you have. If you had homemade sauce it is ok to add a can of store bought plain sauce to "dumbdown" the heat of the jalapeno. There is really no other remedy for over spiced food other than adding to the volume of the food it is in.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.