Was Einstein an atheist?

For Einstein the Word God was Devoid of the Divine.

Most mortals believe in a "personal God", in heaven and souls, in idols and all kinds of sacred follies - - - and they also believe that Einstein believed in God.

Not only Einstein's personal God had been dead all along. In fact God was never even alive according to Einstein.

According to Einstein, God is "a product of human weakness".

Einstein's quotes have been used by dealers of delusions to confuse the common man to fool him about Einstein's true religious beliefs. Einstein categorically rejected the supernatural.

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"It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly."

, the quick answer is that Einstein (maybe) did not believe in a personal God. It is however, interesting how he arrived at that conclusion.

In developing the theory of relativity, Einstein realized that the equations led to the conclusion that the universe had a beginning. He didn't like the idea of a beginning, because he thought one would have to conclude that the universe was created by God. So, he added a cosmological constant to the equation to attempt to get rid of the beginning.

He said this was one of the worst mistakes of his life. Of course, the results of Edwin Hubble confirmed that the universe was expanding and had a beginning at some point in the past. So, Einstein became a deist - a believer in an impersonal creator God:

"I'm NOT an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist.

We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangements of the books, but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God."

Towards the Further Shore (Victor Gollancz, London, 1968), p. 156; quoted in Jammer, p. 97

"I am able to recognize, there are yet people who say there is no God. But what really makes me angry is that they quote me for the support of such views."

The Viereck interview with Einstein appeared first in the Saturday Evening Post (Oct. 26, 1929, p.17)

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