answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2012-01-28 21:19:54
2012-01-28 21:19:54

He is featured on the Australian ten dollar note.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Banjo Patterson is on the note because he gave Australia an identity to other countries. Dame Mary Gilmore is on the note because she fought for women to be able to vote.


Banjo Patterson Judith WrightJohn Grey



Queen Elizabeth II is the nominal or the titular Head of State of Australia and is therefore guaranteed a position on Australian currency. Andrew (Banjo) Barton Patterson appears only on the new polymer Ten Dollar note.


Banjo Patterson had a heart attack and died aged 76 on February 5, 1941.


No. The banjo was not named after Australian writer AB 'Banjo' Paterson.



Andrew Barton Paterson is his real name, but at the end of anything he wrote he put "The Banjo" after the his favourite family race horse


Waltzing Matilda by Banjo Patterson


The current polymer Australian Ten Dollar note has Andrew Barton (Banjo) Paterson (balladist & journalist) on the front and Dame Mary Gilmore (poet & human rights campaigner) on the back. The $10 note only has the words "Waltzing Matilda" on it. The text along the bottom of the note are excerpts from "The Man From Snowy River". "Waltzing Matilda" and "The Man From Snowy River" are both the work of Banjo Paterson.


Australia puts famous or historically significant Australian identities on its banknotes. The current polymer Australian Ten Dollar note has Andrew Barton (Banjo) Patterson (balladist & journalist) on the front and Dame Mary Gilmore (poet & human rights campaigner) on the back. Banjo Paterson wrote some of Australia's best known poems including "Waltzing Matilda", "The Man From Snowy River" and "Clancy of the Overflow". He was a war correspondent during the Boer War and others, an ambulance driver during WW1 and later served as an officer in the front lines in France where he was wounded.


There are many things printed on Australian banknotes, most too small to see or read even with a magnifying glass. The poem on the front of the current Australian Ten Dollar note shows the opening lines of the "Man from Snowy River" by A.B. (Banjo) Paterson. See the Reserve Bank of Australia link below for a detailed description of the Australian Ten Dollar note.


Australia puts famous or historically significant Australian identities on its banknotes. The original paper Australian Ten Dollar note first issued in 1966, had Francis Howard Greenaway (convict architect) on the front and Henry Lawson (Short story writer & poet) on the back. The 1988 trial of the polymer note was a commemorative for Australia's Bicentenary and had a scene of the HMS Supply landing in Sydney Cove on the front and Aboriginal art on the back. The current polymer Australian Ten Dollar note first issued in 1993, has Andrew Barton (Banjo) Patterson (balladist & journalist) on the front and Dame Mary Gilmore (poet & human rights campaigner) on the back.


Banjo Paterson received no awards or special merit for the poem The Man From Snowy River.



Australian-born Rose Isabella Barton.


Banjo Paterson, Australian Poet, 1864-1941


There is no bird on the Australian Ten Dollar note.


With the exception of the 1988 Bicentennial note, the Australian $10 note is mostly blue.


No. 'Banjo' Paterson mainly wrote bush ballads, but he also wrote short stories.


Banjo Paterson was a master craftsman with Australian idioms and Australian slang, Because he had worked out in the bush, he knew the characters he wrote about, and he knew how to bring them to life in his writing.


AB 'Banjo' Paterson, Australian author and poet, died of a heart attack on 5 February 1941. He was 76 years old.


An Australian Twenty Dollar note is mostly red in colour.


Australian twenty-dollar note was created in 1966.


Australian two-dollar note was created in 1966.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.