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Answered 2009-10-17 03:26:55

Hydrogen gas. This can be tested via the 'pop' test.

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Lots of metals will react with dilute hydrochloric acid; anything above hydrogen in the activity series should do so.


Many metals including alkali metals, alkali earth metals, chromium, nickel and zinc react with dilute hydrochloric acid.



Yes. When most metals react with dilute hydrochloric acid, metal chloride and hydrogen gas are the products. In the case of calcium, calcium chloride and hydrogen gas are produced.


Sorry, copper does not react with hydrochloric acid as it is not reactive enough to do so. Only metals above hydrogen in the reactivity series will react with dilute acids.


Gold does not react with dilute hydrochloric acid. There are quite a few others including Tantalum etc.


Nothing, gold does not react with hydrochloric acid, if there are impurities of other metals in gold then impurities may react and form chloride salts.


The elements that do not react with dilute hydrochloric acid are those in the activity series below H. Those above H will react with it.


no all metals do not react with hydrochloric acids


Sodium will react violently with dilute hydrochloric acid.


No, inert metals as Gold, Platinum and Palladium do not react with hydrochloric acid.


The sandstone grains will not be affected, but the cementing material between grains could react with dilute hydrochloric acid if it is composed of calcite. Chances are, though, that the cementing material is silicate in nature, and therefore will not react with dilute hydrochloric acid.


When dilute acids and metals are mixed you will get Hydrogen gas and salts



No reaction will be observed. Copper is too unreactive and cannot displace hydrogen from hydrochloric acid. Only reactive metals (above hydrogen in the reactivity series) will react with dilute acids.


The metals present in bronze are copper and zinc. Though copper does not react with dilute acids, zinc does.


Magnesium react easily with hydrochloric acid and magnesium chloride is obtained.


The general rule is that when a metal and an acid react, they produce a salt and hydrogen gas. For example:Magnesium + Hydrochloric Acid --> Magnesium Chloride + HydrogenSodium + Hydrochloric Acid --> Sodium Chloride + Hydrogen



For example metals as Pt, Au, Os and other.


Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) react with dilute Hydrochloric Acid (HCl) to form Sodium chloride (NaCl) and water (H2O).


No. First of all, the metal does not dissapear. When a a metal reacts with an acid it forms a corresponding salt, which usually then dissolves. Second, whther or not a reaction occurs depends on both the acid and the metal. Most metals will not react with a dilute weak acid. Some metals will not even react with most strong metals. Gold, platinum, and some platinum group metals will not react with acid except for aqua regia, a special mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acid. Ruthenium will not react with acid at all.


Hydrogen gas is produced when acids react with some metals. Protons are reduced as the metal is oxidized.


Aluminum reacts slower then similar metals such as Magnesium or Zinc because of an Aluminum Oxide (Al2O3) layer. The dilute acid has to break down the Al2O3 where as in some other reactions this process is not necessary.


Generally precious and semiprecious metals will not react with dilute acid. These include copper, gold, silver, platinum, and platinum group metals. Gold and platinum will not even react with concentrated strong acids.



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