What are emus?

Emus are large, flightless birds of Australia. They grow to between 1.6 metres and 2 metres high, on average. They weigh between 30 and 45 kilograms, with the female usually slightly heavier than the male. They have brown shaggy feathers which act as insulation against heat, whilst their head feathers are darker. They have brown eyes, a blue patch on their neck, and three toes on each foot.

Although emus are classed as birds, they are one of the very few birds that can't actually fly at all. They are related to a group of birds called ratites. Other ratites include the ostrich from Africa and the rhea from South America.
Emus are large, flightless birds of Australia. They grow to between 1.6 metres and 2 metres high, on average. They weigh between 30 and 45 kilograms, with the female usually slightly heavier than the male. They have brown shaggy feathers which act as insulation against heat, whilst their head feathers are darker. They have brown eyes, a blue patch on their neck, and three toes on each foot.

Although emus are classed as birds, they are one of the very few birds that can't actually fly at all. They are related to a group of birds called ratites. Other ratites include the ostrich from Africa and the rhea from South America.