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What are your options if you have sole physical and legal custody but your 15-year-old daughter refuses to come home after a weekend with her father?

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2004-11-15 19:59:57
2004-11-15 19:59:57

I've personally been there done that and have the T Shirt. Let her stay, as long as he's a good parent. You'll get her back one day. CA Family Law Code 3042. (a) If a child is of sufficient age and capacity to reason so as to form an intelligent preference as to custody, the court shall consider and give due weight to the wishes of the child in making an order granting or modifying custody. More info at http://www.steveshorr.com/MATTERS_CONSIDERED_IN_GRANTING_CUSTODY.htm

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If the mother has legal custody but leaves the state and doesn't have physical custody of your child then that must mean the child is with someone who doesn't have custody. I assume you are not married. In that case, you must establish your paternity in court and request legal and physical custody. If the mother has left the state without taking her child with her the court will certainly want to know who the child is with and will certainly consider awarding legal custody to the other biological parent, you.Perhaps you can convince the mother to consent to your getting legal and physical custody. If not sole custody, then joint legal and physical custody.You should consult with an attorneywho specializes in custody issues. The attorney can review your situation and explain your rights and options.

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There is a difference between physical and legal custody. The court can award joint legal custody to the parents and determine that one parent will have physical custody. It can also award joint physical and legal custody with the child sharing her time equally at the homes of the parents. Joint legal custody custody is usually reserved for parents who get along and are willing to raise their child on a solid foundation of cooperation. Couples who do not get along are not good candidates for joint legal custody and that factor will be considered in the decision by the judge. The father can petition for a modification of the custody order but he will need to provide evidence that the modification is warranted, usually by showing there has been a change in the circumstances that caused the judge to award sole custody to the mother. In order to convince the court to take physical custody from the mother, the father would need to provide evidence that the change would be in the best interest of the child based on the unfitness of the mother as a parent. See the related question link for factors the court may consider if asked to declare a parent unfit. He should consult with an attorney who can review the situation and explain both his options under state laws and his chances of success in the particular court. An attorney could present the father's petition in the best possible manner.

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He needs to make an appointment with an attorney who specializes in custody issues who can review all the details of the situation and explain his rights and options.He needs to make an appointment with an attorney who specializes in custody issues who can review all the details of the situation and explain his rights and options.He needs to make an appointment with an attorney who specializes in custody issues who can review all the details of the situation and explain his rights and options.He needs to make an appointment with an attorney who specializes in custody issues who can review all the details of the situation and explain his rights and options.

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none. watever you want. u could try foundation blush lipstick eye liner mascara eye shadow. there are so many different options. have fun!

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You need to consult with an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.

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You need to prove to the court that the person who presently has custody is unfit. You need to consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues who can review your situation and explain your options. The attorney can advise you of the difficulty of your case.

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Once you are pregnant your options are as follows:have the baby and become a full time parenthave the baby and give full custody to the fatherhave the baby and share custody and responsibility with the father

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Consult with a good attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.

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Generally, no. However, a step-parent can obtain custody under limited extraordinary circumstances. The party should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues who can review the situation and explain the options, if any.

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Generally, there must be some change in circumstances for a court to modify a custody order. Perhaps the father has a more stable job, a better place to live, has improved his parenting skills, etc. The father should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues. The attorney can review the situation, the existing court orders and provide the father with his options and the likelihood of the court modifying the custody order. It is always best to have an experienced attorney represent you in these matters.Some general background regarding custody:Custody labels change depending upon the jurisdiction in which you reside. It is important to know and understandthe proper custody labels and have them applied in your child custody order. Generally there are two main categories of custody:Legal Custody: Legal custody refers to making major decisions in your child's life such as medical and health related decisions, education, and welfare.Physical Custody: Physical custody refers to which parent the children reside with on a day to day basis.Sole LegalOne parent has the right to make any decisions that affect the child.Joint LegalBoth parents have the right to be involved in decisions regarding the child.Sole PhysicalThe child resides with one parent who is said to have primary physical custody and the other parent has visitation rights pursuant to a visitation schedule either issued by the court or arranged by the parents.Joint PhysicalArrangements are designed that provide the child will spend 50% of their time with each parent. Child support is modified based on this time split and the differences between their incomes.Generally the phrase full custody is used to refer to a parent with sole legal custody. Sole legal custody means that the parent has the right to make all decisions that affect the child. That includes such things as where the child resides, attends school, medical treatment, etc. Joint legal custody means the parents both have an equal right to make decisions regarding the child and one must consult the other before making important decisions. Primary physical custody refers to the parent with whom the child resides the majority of the time.

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Yes, you can under certain circumstances. You should make an appointment with an attorney who specializes in custody issues who can review your particular situation and explain your options. You need expert legal representation in that type of action.

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Child is residing with maternal father and grandparents (father's side) in Shelby County. Mother's address unknown, but in Shelby County. What are father's options for temporary custody?

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Students studying physical therapy have quite a few options for tuition assistance. College Scholarships has a page with a lot of options: http://www.collegescholarships.org/scholarships/physical-therapy.htm

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You should consult with an attorney who can review your situation and explain your rights and options. There are several recent stories in the news about mothers in the military losing custody of their children. Explore that possibility ahead of time.You should consult with an attorney who can review your situation and explain your rights and options. There are several recent stories in the news about mothers in the military losing custody of their children. Explore that possibility ahead of time.You should consult with an attorney who can review your situation and explain your rights and options. There are several recent stories in the news about mothers in the military losing custody of their children. Explore that possibility ahead of time.You should consult with an attorney who can review your situation and explain your rights and options. There are several recent stories in the news about mothers in the military losing custody of their children. Explore that possibility ahead of time.

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That determination must be made by an experienced attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation, all the details of your case and explain your options under your state laws and your court system. There must be a good reason for a court to approve a change in custody.That determination must be made by an experienced attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation, all the details of your case and explain your options under your state laws and your court system. There must be a good reason for a court to approve a change in custody.That determination must be made by an experienced attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation, all the details of your case and explain your options under your state laws and your court system. There must be a good reason for a court to approve a change in custody.That determination must be made by an experienced attorney in your jurisdiction who can review your situation, all the details of your case and explain your options under your state laws and your court system. There must be a good reason for a court to approve a change in custody.

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She should talk to an attorney specializing in family law to see what her options are.

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If you're a single father, you have no assumed rights to the child until paternity has been established by a court of jurisdiction. As such that will need to be your first step. Then, if the child is in the custody of the state you can petition for custody to be transferred to you. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in family law who can review your situation and explain your options.

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After they have been adopted . . . no. Not unless there was fraud involved in the adoption. If you have questions about your children's adoption you should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody and adoption. The attorney can review the details and explain your rights and options, if any.After they have been adopted . . . no. Not unless there was fraud involved in the adoption. If you have questions about your children's adoption you should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody and adoption. The attorney can review the details and explain your rights and options, if any.After they have been adopted . . . no. Not unless there was fraud involved in the adoption. If you have questions about your children's adoption you should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody and adoption. The attorney can review the details and explain your rights and options, if any.After they have been adopted . . . no. Not unless there was fraud involved in the adoption. If you have questions about your children's adoption you should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody and adoption. The attorney can review the details and explain your rights and options, if any.

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Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.Courts do not grant parental rights, custody and restraining orders without evidence. They do not grant custody to a man who only "says" he's the father or to someone who is "presumed" to be the father. They establish paternity first. You should contact an attorney who can review your situation and explain your options.

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That issue is determined after a hearing during which the court will consider several factors. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues in your jurisdictions who can review your situation and explain your options.

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It all depends on her height and build. Talk with a pediatrician about your concerns before mentioning it to her or taking any overt action. Provide your daughter with plenty of healthy options and encourage regular physical activity, but don't regulate her portions unless advised to do so by a doctor.

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The father must seek the advice of an attorney who specializes in custody issues. The answer depends on the laws in your jurisdiction and the circumstances, which can best be presented to the court on his behalf by an experienced attorney. The court may take into consideration the fact that the "father" who has had custody has developed a close relationship with the child and taking custody away from him would be extremely traumatic for the child. An attorney could review the situation and explain the options.The father must seek the advice of an attorney who specializes in custody issues. The answer depends on the laws in your jurisdiction and the circumstances, which can best be presented to the court on his behalf by an experienced attorney. The court may take into consideration the fact that the "father" who has had custody has developed a close relationship with the child and taking custody away from him would be extremely traumatic for the child. An attorney could review the situation and explain the options.The father must seek the advice of an attorney who specializes in custody issues. The answer depends on the laws in your jurisdiction and the circumstances, which can best be presented to the court on his behalf by an experienced attorney. The court may take into consideration the fact that the "father" who has had custody has developed a close relationship with the child and taking custody away from him would be extremely traumatic for the child. An attorney could review the situation and explain the options.The father must seek the advice of an attorney who specializes in custody issues. The answer depends on the laws in your jurisdiction and the circumstances, which can best be presented to the court on his behalf by an experienced attorney. The court may take into consideration the fact that the "father" who has had custody has developed a close relationship with the child and taking custody away from him would be extremely traumatic for the child. An attorney could review the situation and explain the options.

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If you were married to him when you gave birth to the children he is presumed, by law, to be their father. If you are still married he doesn't need to petition for custody but he can petition for visitations. If you know he is not the father then you should consult with an attorney who specializes in custody issues to determine your options under the law in your jurisdiction.

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You need to find legal proof that the mother is unfit to have custody of the child, drug testing and home inspections can be ordered resulting in the decision that a parent is unfit. Remember to stay within the law while trying to get legal custody of the child and always do what you feel is in the best interest of the child.


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