Meteorology and Weather

What area over which winds blow creates high waves?

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2014-04-15 13:39:16
2014-04-15 13:39:16

Winds blowing over a large area create powerful, high, and fast waves.

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High-pressure air from the blowing winds presses down on the surface and creates waves. Another person's answer: I think winds that blow for a long time create powerful, high and fast waves.


The winds from a hurricane blowing across the water's surface creates waves. The stronger the wind, the bigger the waves. Put some water in a bowl and blow across the surface. You made waves.


Because winds blow over the ocean causing waves


Winds are simply air that is 'sucked' from a high-pressure area to a low-pressure area.


It creates East Winds and then they soon create a storm or lightning


no, it is actually the other way around


global winds are created by the unequal heating of earths surface. when the sun is at an angle, like in the poles, where it covers a large area, it heats less. then winds blow from the equator to the north pole and creates global winds.


local winds-are winds that blow over short distances caused by unequal heating of the earths surface in a small area. global winds-are winds that blow around the earth from the north pole to the south pole.


Local winds are winds that blow over short distances caused by unequal heating of the earths surface in a small area.


global winds are winds that blow over long distances.local winds are winds that blow over short distances. you can't type because i had to fix your mistake on "blow" :(


Local winds are winds that blow over short distances caused by unequal heating of the earths surface in a small area.


why north winds blow to southwest


Local Winds blow over short distances.They are caused by the unequal heating of the Earth's surface within a small area.


Global winds blow North to South


Northern trade winds blow from the north.


winds blow sideways because of the rotation of the earth.


In zones where air ascends, the air is less dense than its surroundings and this creates a center of low pressure. Winds blow from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure, and so the surface winds would tend to blow toward a low pressure center. In zones where air descends back to the surface, the air is more dense than its surroundings and this creates a center of high atmospheric pressure. Since winds blow from areas ofhigh pressureto areas oflow pressure, winds spiral outward away from the high pressure. The Coriolis Effect deflects air toward the right in the northern hemisphere and creates a general clockwise rotation around the high pressure center. In the southern hemisphere the effect is just the opposite, and winds circulate in a counterclockwise rotation about the high pressure center. Such winds circulating around a high pressure center are calledanticyclonic windsand around a low pressure area they are calledcyclonic winds.


The Trade winds blow from east to west, these winds are the most common in the Caribbean. The Prevailing winds blow from west to east.


Trade Winds in both hemispheres blow from the east.


The "fetch"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fetch_%28geography%29


trade winds in the southern hemisphere blow from the southeast!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


The Etesian winds blow from a northerly direction off of the Aegean Sea.


The Westerlies are winds that blow from West to East across the United States.


They blow south-southeast. Wind directions are always given as the direction from which they blow, such as "winds out of the northwest."


there are 3 types of wind systems=permanent winds are also known as prevailing winds or planetary winds. it is sub divided in to the trade winds, anti trade winds, and polar winds.periodic winds are also known as seasonal windsor monsoons. they blow from water bodies to land.local winds blow in a limited area and have local significance. it is sub divided in to land and sea breeze , mountain and vally wind



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