Divorce and Marriage Law
Judaism

What can a Jewish woman do if her husband refuses to grant her a Jewish divorce?

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2010-08-21 16:12:19
2010-08-21 16:12:19

Report him to the Jewish Authorities.

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It's Hebrew for "chained" woman. It's when a man refuses to grant his wife a Jewish divorce (Get). These women can't remarry Jewish, but they can report it to the Jewish Authorities. If the man STILL refuses, he can be expelled from the Jewish Community.


It's a clause for the Conservative Jewish GET. It forces the husband to grant his wife a Jewish divorce, protected the wife from becoming an agunah (chained wife).


She is an agunah because her husband refused to grant her a Jewish divorce.


My Reform Jewish parents went through the Jewish Court to get a Jewish divorce without any difficulties. Reform Judaism doesn't require a Get, but you can still have one, and I sincerely believe ALL Jews should have protection.


YES! Very much so. If a woman is not given her "get" she is known as an "agunah" (chained woman) as she is unable to re-marry religiously and the synagogue authority and community does everything in its power to force the man to grant her the Jewish divorce. The man can even be excommunicated and cast out of Judaism. Appeals are often made to the government in the Diasporah, and in Israel a man can face a jail sentence of hefty fines if he refuses to grant the woman her "get".




It is the court - not the wife (or husband) who grants the divorce. In most states, if one spouse files for a divorce, the court will grant the divorce (assuming there are no jurisdictional issues). She may not want a divorce, she may not agree to a divorce, but she cannot prevent you from obtaining a divorce.



Absolutely! Especially if a man refuses to grant his wife a Jewish divorce. Expelling a Jew from the Jewish Community at large is called Kherem (חרם) or an Excommunication, just like in Christianity. Baruch Spinozza and Mordecai Kaplan were two Jews who were both put in Kherem.


Go ahead- he cannot stop you. The court will grant a divorce without his signature in the United States.Go ahead- he cannot stop you. The court will grant a divorce without his signature in the United States.Go ahead- he cannot stop you. The court will grant a divorce without his signature in the United States.Go ahead- he cannot stop you. The court will grant a divorce without his signature in the United States.


No- Grant was not Jewish.


Simply said, YES! The mear fact that he is in jail is reason enough for the judge to grant the divorce. Have papers served to him where he is at.


It is the court - not the wife (or husband) who grants the divorce. In most states, if one spouse files for a divorce, the court will grant the divorce (assuming there are no jurisdictional issues). She may not want a divorce, she may not agree to a divorce, but she cannot prevent you from obtaining a divorce.



Yes - especially in the case of Orthodox Jews. One of the most common reasons is a man refusing to grant his wife a Jewish divorce (get).


Attend all of your court dates. Whether your soon to be ex-husband signs the papers, or not, the Judge will grant you a divorce. It may take a few months longer, but his unwillingness to sign the papers will not prevent a divorce. Hang in there! Freedom will be yours, as long as you are determined and diligent. Good luck!


You can file for a divorce without him. Have you made efforts to contact him. You want the judge to know that you have tried but he's not around. The judge can still grant the divorce. Good luck!


When Grant and Vivian have plans to leave after her divorce, but then Vivians husband decides the only way he will give her the divorce is if he can see his children every weekend, ruining they're plans of leaving.


The question is slightly ambiguous. It could be asking either one of two questions.Here are short answers to both questions:1). A rabbi who is married can divorce his spouse, by means of the same identical procedures as any other Jew.2). A Jewish married couple who wish to divorce may consult a rabbi for guidance on the proper procedure to obtain a religious divorce under Jewish law. But the rabbi doesn't 'grant' the divorce. Technically, in Jewish law, the couple themselves perform the divorce, just as the couple themselves perform the wedding and create the marriage.


Yes - if you live within a jurisdiction with "no-fault" divorce laws. Where "at-fault divorce" laws are in effect, a party requesting a divorce must demonstrate that there are grounds for the divorce. If, for example, someone files for divorce on the grounds of adultery in a jurisdiction where "at-fault divorce" is the law, and the other spouse disputes the grounds - i.e. denies adultery took place and refuses to agree to the divorce, a judge may deny the divorce petition. In some jurisdictions men may divorce their wives at-will, but women may not divorce their husbands without their husband's consent.


Yes. Both of his parents were Jewish.


Your husband can sue you and your boyfriend depending on your states laws. Also, if your husband finds out you are dating, a judge can grant him a divorce on the grounds of adultery.



They're stupid people who think rules don't apply to them! The Jewish authorities can SEVERELY punish them for this. ****************************** I believe that in such cases, the men are angry with their wives, and are simply being vindictive by refusing the divorce (or get). Married couples may have many arguments, and build up great resentment. Resentful people may seek revenge.



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