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What comes before ounces in the metric system?


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Answered 2010-02-02 01:06:47

"Ounces" is not part of the metric system.

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Answered 2015-12-29 22:30:36

Nothing. The ounce is not a metric unit.

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Megameters; but this is not commonly used.


Metric comes from the Greek word metron which means to measure. The metric system is a system for (or of) measurements. Imperial comes from the system of weights and measures that were standardized for use throughout the British Empire in 1824. Imperial is the adjective derived from empire. Metric- from the ancient Greek word for measure. Imperial because it was used across an empire.


The modern metric system is SI units, which comes from the French Le Système international d'unités. It was first published in 1960.


Because it is easierThe metric system was created to set a standard. The standard is how to get from one unit of the metric system to another unit by knowing how many of each unit is in another unit. The system was created to make things easier when it comes to measurements.


Because America doesn't know what we are doing when it comes to academics.


With the metric system, that comes out to 550cm.


There is no name until you get to 1000 kilometres which is 1 megametre.


The unit of volume for the metric system that proceeds liters (L) would be the less used deciliter. You might use milliliters (mL), though.


The metric system uses base ten in all its units. That is everything comes in tens, because this is the way we count normally, the calculations are much easier.


The International System of Units, abbreviated SI, comes from the French Le Système International d'Unités.


Ounces then pounds (16 ounces = 1 pound)


The next smallest prefix from milli- is micro-. Milli- denotes thousandths, micro- denotes millionths.


Wikipedia provides this information: 1 US fluid ounce = 29.5735297 milliliters (about 30 mL) so your conversion for ounces would be using '30"(millileters) x the number of ounces you want to convert. Therefore; 2 ounces would equal 60 millileters. Or you could get real fancy and use the long string of nuumbers x the number of ounces you want to convert - then you'd have a real mess if you were adding the liquid to a batter. Truth is, there isn't any real conversion for the metric system into the US measuring system. It always comes out with a left-over digits. So, the easiest and less frustrating thing to do is to round-up the number. Hence 30 and pray. I think Europe should have converted to our system, at least we have a measurment system based on equal segments that can be multiplied, divided or added to produce a whole number.


16 ounces of what? Density comes into play here


These are some common metric prefixes: milli: 1/1000 micro: 1/1,000,000 nano: 1/1,000,000,000 pico: 1/1,000,000,000,000 Note that these prefixes are not just used for meters; they can be used with any unit.


It comes out as a 318/60r18It comes out as a 318/60r18


The metric system is easier to learn and use, while the imperial system uses somewhat arbitrary numbers, such as 32 degrees for the freezing point of water. Which one you consider better all comes down to personal preference. It should be noted, however, that the United States is now the only country in the world still using the imperial measurement system.


5 liters comes to 169.07 US fluid ounces @33.814 ounces per liter.


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250 grams of honey comes out to about 8.82 ounces.



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