Constellations

What constellations are visible all year long?

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2009-07-10 04:29:12
2009-07-10 04:29:12

Depends where you live....

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The constellations near the plane of the ecliptic (the zodiacal constellations) are only visible at certain times of the year. The constellations towards the poles (N and S) are visible at all times of the year from their respective hemispheres. In the South, the Southern Cross would be one example and in the North the Great Bear (or plough) would be another.


because the circumpolar constellations are visible all year long and the others are not.


Circumpolar constellations are visible all year long, depending on where you are viewing them from. At the north pole, or the south pole, some constellations are visible year-round, these are the circumpolar constellations. On the equator, there are no circumpolar constellations because of the earths rotation, that is why circumpolar constellations are at the "poles". Some of the circumpolar constellations can also be viewed from other parts of the same hemisphere, such as the big dipper and the little dipper, although they are circumpolar, they are also seen in other parts of the northern hemisphere. Circumpolar constellations in the northern hemisphere, will never be seen at the south pole, and vice versa. I hope this helped.


As earth orbits the sun, different constellations come into view while others disappear. Circumpolar constellations are visible all year long, other constellations are not.


All of them. The 'constellations' are a human invention. They're all visible from any place that humans are, or are likely to go for a very long time in the future.


Half of all constellations are visible from the north pole, andall of them are visible from one inch north of the equator.


No. As we orbit the Sun different constellations become visible, but we can only see them when it is dark. Constellations are in the sky during daylight, but the Sun is so bright, we cannot see them. A few months after that, they start to be visible in the evenings and soon at night, by which time other constellations are in daylight and cannot be seen. You will see any constellation at the same time of year, every year. So the constellations you see in the night sky tonight are the same as the ones you will see on this date in any other year. The only thing that will differ is where the Moon and planets are.


All stars within (your latitude) of the celestial pole are above your horizon all the time,and are visible to you whenever it's dark enough.


They are constellations which are near the celestial North and South Poles: that is, ones which are above the earth's poles.


It depends entirely on what latitude you are observing from. Some stars and constellations are always visible, some are never visible and some for only part of the year


There are 88 official constellations, all of which are visible from Earth, but not from every location.


The circumpolar constellations


All of them are. The constellations were all invented by human beings, on Earth. None were invented that can't be seen from Earth.


Because we tend to do our stargazing at roughly the same time of night whenever we go out, but the constellations move through our clock.-- Constellations within (your latitude) of the celestial pole are visible at any time on any clear night, all year around.-- And constellations farther from the pole of the sky are visible at some time of every clear night, for 9 or 10 months of the year.That is related to Earth's movement around the Sun.


Draco is just west (higher longitude) of Ursa Major and Ursa Minor. All three are "circumpolar" constellations visible for most of the year in the Northern Hemisphere.


You can only see constellations at night. However, not all are visible at one time or one location. During the year the viewable constellations change as the earth orbits the sun. Also, there are ones that can only be viewed in the northern or southern hemisphere not both.


Yes, all constellations are visible at one point through out the seasons.


There are dozens, but it would depend on where you live. For example, if you live in the Arctic or Antarctic, you can't see ANY stars at midsummer, when the Sun is up all the time.



From Northern Europe, Ursa Minor, Draco, most of Ursa Major, Cassiopeia, Perseus, Cepheus.


No. For the Sun to be "in" one of the constellations means that the constellation is BEHIND the Sun, and so invisible. Any constellation is, on average, visible for 9 months of the year, with the 3 months of non-visibility being centered on that constellation.


No. For the Sun to be "in" one of the constellations means that the constellation is BEHIND the Sun, and so invisible. Any constellation is, on average, visible for 9 months of the year, with the 3 months of non-visibility being centered on that constellation.


No. For the Sun to be "in" one of the constellations means that the constellation is BEHIND the Sun, and so invisible. Any constellation is, on average, visible for 9 months of the year, with the 3 months of non-visibility being centered on that constellation.


No. For the Sun to be "in" one of the constellations means that the constellation is BEHIND the Sun, and so invisible. Any constellation is, on average, visible for 9 months of the year, with the 3 months of non-visibility being centered on that constellation.


No. For the Sun to be "in" one of the constellations means that the constellation is BEHIND the Sun, and so invisible. Any constellation is, on average, visible for 9 months of the year, with the 3 months of non-visibility being centered on that constellation.



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