answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2015-08-27 18:27:00

For galaxies without the gravitational underpinning of a central supermassive black hole, the mutual gravitational attraction of the stars plays a lead role in determining its general shape, rotation, and other characteristics. Recently, low-luminosity stars such as red dwarfs have been found to contribute a significant quantity of mass to galaxies; there is also gas, dust, and non-visible matter ("dark matter") adding to the gravitational pull.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2015-05-29 19:55:20

Controls... In what sense? If you mean, what keeps a galaxy together, that's NOT just the central black hole, whose mass is only a small fraction of the total mass of the galaxy. The galaxy is held together by ALL the masses in the galaxy - mainly the so-called dark matter (which is something different from a black hole), which makes up 80-90% of a typical galaxy - plus the remaining 10-20% of normal matter, and the small amount of matter in black holes.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions


Yes. Some galaxies, particularly irregular galaxies, appear to lack supermassive black holes.


All galaxies have supermassive black holes in their centers.


Most, if not all, galaxies have a supermassive black hole at their centre - irrespective of their morphology.


A central, supermassive black hole.



All galaxies are likely to have stellar black holes. In general, all or most of the bigger galaxies have supermassive black holes in their center.


The supermassive blackholes at the center of galaxies.


Those nuclei are associated with a supermassive black hole. Basically all galaxies have a supermassive black hole, but some are more active than others - apparently when they are in the process of ingesting matter, and have a large accretion disk.


Supermassive black holes have masses that are millions to billions of solar masses, and only exist in the center of galaxies. They hold the galaxies together, and are the second largest type of black hole, besides the rare deep core black holes.


Yes. It's currently believed that the Milky Way and most galaxies contain a supermassive black hole at the centre.


Supermassive black holes found at the centers of galaxies are related to the stellar velocity dispersion in the bulge of the galaxy. To a lesser degree, there is also a correlation with the mass of the galaxy.


Generally older stars. Most, if not all galaxies have a supermassive black hole at their centre.


We often find supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies. Stellar black holes are found in different places in space. We have a supermassive black hole in the middle of our own Milky Way galaxy. Scientists say that it is a very small black hole compared to the ones in some other galaxies. Very amazing.


Most galaxies are believed to have supermassive black holes at their centers.


Quasars are related to supermassive black holes, and those are located at the center of galaxies.


A supermassive black hole, like at the center of spiral galaxies.


Perhaps you mean "thought to be"? - It is believed that all, or most, galaxies have a supermassive black hole at their center.


Most black holes form when massive stars exhaust their fuel and their cores collapse. There are also supermassive black holes at the centers of most galaxies. Scientists are not sure how supermassive black holes form.


Most galaxies have a supermassive black hole at the center and millions (at least) of stellar mass black holes.


It seems that most galaxies have a supermassive black hole in their center. These supermassive black holes have a mass that is millions of times the mass of our Sun; in larger galaxies, billions of times the mass of our Sun. Hence the name "supermassive". For comparison, when a star collapses, it is expected to produce a black hole that has less mass than the star originally had (some mass goes into space, in the supernova explosion), in other words, a few solar masses, or a few tens of them, at most.It seems that most galaxies have a supermassive black hole in their center. These supermassive black holes have a mass that is millions of times the mass of our Sun; in larger galaxies, billions of times the mass of our Sun. Hence the name "supermassive". For comparison, when a star collapses, it is expected to produce a black hole that has less mass than the star originally had (some mass goes into space, in the supernova explosion), in other words, a few solar masses, or a few tens of them, at most.It seems that most galaxies have a supermassive black hole in their center. These supermassive black holes have a mass that is millions of times the mass of our Sun; in larger galaxies, billions of times the mass of our Sun. Hence the name "supermassive". For comparison, when a star collapses, it is expected to produce a black hole that has less mass than the star originally had (some mass goes into space, in the supernova explosion), in other words, a few solar masses, or a few tens of them, at most.It seems that most galaxies have a supermassive black hole in their center. These supermassive black holes have a mass that is millions of times the mass of our Sun; in larger galaxies, billions of times the mass of our Sun. Hence the name "supermassive". For comparison, when a star collapses, it is expected to produce a black hole that has less mass than the star originally had (some mass goes into space, in the supernova explosion), in other words, a few solar masses, or a few tens of them, at most.



The center of many galaxies is suspected to house a "supermassive black hole". The black hole may even weigh more than all the stars in that galaxy combined. Spiral galaxies are more likely to contain a supermassive black hole.


The super-massive black holes found at the center of most galaxies occur since they are at the gravitational center and therefore have more matter at their disposal when they form.


ALL larger galaxies - or at least most of them - have a supermassive black hole at its center.


Well, there are two kinds of black holes. The normal black holes and the supermassive black holes. The supermassive black holes are a billion times bigger then our sun, while normal black holes are the same size as the Earth.



Copyright ยฉ 2021 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.