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2015-02-18 17:11:14
2015-02-18 17:11:14

Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" church) faced severe persecution throughout the eastern United States. In Ohio, persecution stirred up by disaffected Mormons grew so strong that staying was not a viable option. In Missouri, residents were upset that a large number of anti-slavery Mormons were moving in and fearful that this might upset the political climate. Some counties voted to expel the Mormons and in some cities Mormons were prevented from voting in a local election. This caused some (later excommunicated) Mormons to fight against the injustice, and for Missourians to retaliate. The Governor of Missouri then issued an Extermination Order, saying that all Mormons should be "treated as enemies" and "exterminated or driven from the state". Mobs invaded Mormon settlements, burned homes, stole property, and massacred men, women, and children. Mormon leaders were tarred and feathered, and the Prophet was arrested and imprisoned by the state militia. The Mormons were finally driven from Missouri in the dead of winter and sought peace in Illinois. In Illinois the Mormons bought land to create their own city, Nauvoo. However, persecution soon followed. Mormon leaders went into hiding and the Prophet was again arrested and this time murdered while awaiting trial. The state government finally asked the Mormons to leave in order to preserve the public peace. Throughout all this, the Mormons sought help from the federal government more than once, but were denied.Realizing that the government was not sympathetic to their plight, the Mormons sought religious freedom outside the United States, in what was then a mostly uninhabited portion of northern Mexico - what is now Utah.

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after the lds (Mormons) people were run out of Nauvo they all walked all the way from Illinois to Utah. eventually all the lds people migrated there and soon there was enough people to make Utah a state.



Mormons (also known as the Church of the Latter Day Saints, or the LDS church).


My experience with Utah, If your not LDS don't do it


There are approximately 1.75 million Latter-Day Saints in Utah. However, that is the number of people whose names appear on record. The actual number of members active in the LDS church is much smaller.


Westminster University does not release the religious affiliation of their students. Judging by the LDS Institute enrollment numbers, there are quite a few Mormons at Westiminster, but not nearly as many as you will find in other Utah universities.


No. Although they have strong ties to Utah they are not LDS (Mormon). They come from St. George, Utah. Meg lived in Salt Lake City, Utah and attended school at University of Utah. Dia also lives in Salt Lake City. Wiki reads their origin is in Draper, Utah.Meg = AtheistDia = undecided


The Mormons (LDS) under Brigham Young, to get away from the control of the US Federal government and set up their own independent country of "Deseret".


To flee persecution from mobs in Illinois. After the murder of Joseph Smith, Jr. & his brother Hyrum in 1844 mobs attacked LDS homes and communities near Nauvoo, Illinois, burning homes and threatening the LDS people. After a period of time the LDS people gathered together and migrated westward until they settled in Utah in 1847.


The LDS church was officially founded on April 6, 1830.


No, certainly not, although there are Mormons attending every college in Utah (and in fact, it's quite likely that there are Mormons attending every college/university in the nation, perhaps with the exception of some Catholic or Protestant schools). The only schools in Utah that are affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church) in Utah are Brigham Young University in Provo and LDS Business College in Salt Lake City. Other large Universities in Utah, such as Utah State, Weber State, University of Utah, Utah Valley University, Snow College, Salt Lake Community College, Southern Utah University, and Dixie State are all public universities affiliated with the state. Westminster is a large private liberal arts school in Salt Lake City that is also unaffiliated with the LDS Church.


In 1844 following the assignation of the Latter Day Saint prophet over 11,000 Mormons made the trek to the unincorporated land we know as Utah today to avoid persecution in Illinois. The Mormons named the land Deseret and were annexed into the Union from Mexico as the Utah Territory in 1850 as a result of the Mexican-American War. Utah was not granted statehood until 1896 as a result of the LDS practice of polygamy (having multiple wives) the U.S. government would not admit Utah until the practice was stopped.


In 1844 following the assignation of the Latter Day Saint prophet over 11,000 Mormons made the trek to the unincorporated land we know as Utah today to avoid persecution in Illinois. The Mormons named the land Deseret and were annexed into the Union from Mexico as the Utah Territory in 1850 as a result of the Mexican-American War. Utah was not granted statehood until 1896 as a result of the LDS practice of polygamy (having multiple wives) the U.S. government would not admit Utah until the practice was stopped.


In 1844 following the assignation of the Latter Day Saint prophet over 11,000 Mormons made the trek to the unincorporated land we know as Utah today to avoid persecution in Illinois. The Mormons named the land Deseret and were annexed into the Union from Mexico as the Utah Territory in 1850 as a result of the Mexican-American War. Utah was not granted statehood until 1896 as a result of the LDS practice of polygamy (having multiple wives) the U.S. government would not admit Utah until the practice was stopped.


About 2000 came to Utah in 1847 with Brigham Young.Entry: 1847: Aug. "Thurs. 26 - '...Between six and seven hundred wagons, with about two thousand souls enter the valley that fall." (LDS Church Chronology 1805-1914, page 34)But the Mormons kept coming and about 70,000 Mormons came to Salt Lake City between 1847 and 1867.


On July 24, 1847. In Utah it is that day iscelebrated as Pioneer Day. However members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS or Mormons) were still asked to immigrate to Salt Lake City until the 1950's.


Dia from The Voice is from Utah but has not said what her religion is.


YYes they are the same thing just different names


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints or LDS


Yes.LDS (Mormons) believe in the Bible. Therefore they believe that Jesus is the Son of God.Also the LDS Church has 'Articles of Faith' and the first one reads, "We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in His Son, Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost." (LDS - Articles of Faith, No. 1)


Mormons live everywhere around the USA and also around the world - so it would be stranger if there wouldn't be LDS in NY


The church started in New York, but local persecution drove the Latter Day Saints (LDS) to Ohio and Illinois. Persecution in both those places wound up driving the saints to Utah.


Utah, the state where Mormons settled and built their third temple-the Salt Lake City Temple. It took them 40 years. Salt Lake City is currently the LDS (Mormon) church capital.


The state with the highest LDS population is Utah, with about 60% of the population being a baptized member of the Church. Other states with high LDS populations (as a percentage of the entire population) are Idaho, Arizona, Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, and California.


The President of the LDS church and the first Governor of Utah Territory.



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