Vehicle Titles

What do you do if you lost your vehicle title?

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2006-07-01 23:04:06
2006-07-01 23:04:06

If you had the car titled in your name and just lost the title you can go to the court house can tell them you lost the title and they will make you a new one. This will cost you around $10

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If the vehicle has a lien, the title shouldn't be lost, the lienholder should have it. Once the vehicle is paid in full, they will mail you the title.

The owner of the vehicle needs to call the DMV and pay for and order a new copy of the title to turn over to you.

Get a hold of the motor vehicle department in your state and explain the problem, they will get you a new title.

You must have a title to sell a vehicle if the new owner plans to title the vehicle. If you are selling the car for "parts only", and not planning to put the car back on the road, then you can sell it with a bill of sale only. If they want to title the vehicle, you need to go to your local DMV and apply for a lost/stolen title. Once you get the duplicate title, then you can sell the vehicle.

If you need a replacement for a lost title you must contact you state Motor Vehicle department and pay a lost title replacement fee.

No, you can only replace a lost title. If the vehicle had a lien from the bank, a replacement title will still show the lien.

Take your title to the dealership and they can make you a new key

Generally, the person who's name the car is title in has to file for a lost title. There is a fee. You would need to contact the person who sold/gave you the vehicle.

Go to the DMV with the death certificate and they will let you get another title for a certain amount of money. They charge in California 15 dollars for lost title replacement.

If it's a vehicle title you are talking about, you can visit your local vehicle registration and tax collection office and ask for a duplicate title. Be sure you have the information necessary (VIN, make, model, etc,)

Lost Vehicle TitleGenerally you can apply for a lost title through your state Department of Motor Vehciels or Department of Licensing. It may make it easier if the previous owner goes with you (assuming he is the registered owner). States normally require that a previous owner notify them that a vehicle has been sold. In addition: You will have to submit an application for a lost title/damaged title. I believe only the registered owner of the vehicle from when it was title originally can obtain a replacement.In Ca the lost/not received/transfer form is available at DMV thiis is used for sale on auto where seller still has the title and never transfereed to themselves yet so has no "title" so you include additional title (form is a blank need to fill out all info on vehicle , seller, and buyer turn in with the other title(the one your seller never turned in for themselves, or you can use the lost/not received/transfer form if the other has been lost

File for a lost title , then register it as a vintage vehicle . Bring a bill of sale or other proof of ownership.

Apply for lost title, once received, illegally sign the back of the title, and pay the taxes and the vehicle is yours.

You can't. You nee to contact your state department of motor vehicles to ask how you can replace a lost certificate of title.

Year, make, and model of the vehicle doesn't negate a need for a title. Some states allow you to file for a lost title, some do not.

Totaled vehicles which have been rebuilt generally have a "salvaged vehicle" title, or whatever it's called in your state. Vehicles with a salvaged vehicle title are by definition, not as valuable as the same vehicle with a clean title. If the vehicle is subsequently in another collision, the insurance company will not pay as much since the loss was not as great. Insurance companies only need to pay you for the actual value of the vehicle.

As far as I understand it you cannot sell any motor vehicle to an automotive dealership without the title. Also if the vehicle is not titled in your name the said individual seen on the title would need to be present. The process to getting a title for your vehicle if it has been lost is simple as long as you are the registered owner of the vehicle. The process for acquiring a replacement title is called bonding the title. If you are not the owner on the title the same "bonding" applies it just requires you to get the previous owner of the vehicle involved in the process with a proper bill of sale and or other means of proof that you have taken "ownership" of the vehicle.

If the title was transferred properly, you can request a duplicate title at the vehicle registration office. If the title was not transferred properly, the previous owner may need to do this, then execute a proper transfer of title. The details may vary by state. Something else you could try is going back to the auction where you purchased the vehicle and have them get you a duplicate title and pay them the lost title fee. They will have power of attorney from the person they got it from. I've had to do that a few times.

Motor Vehicle Deptment can do a title search for a fee and issue you a new title if it comes back clean.

If you have proof of purchase for the vehicle you may be able to order a new title in your name if not then you're going to have to hunt down the original owner.

Apply for a duplicate title. Not a problem if you are the registered owner and the purchaser of the new vehicle

You have to get a bill of sale from the original title holder stating that you are now the legal owner of the vehicle. You also have to file a report with the state stating when and how the title was lost. Then you have to go through the title application process to get a new one. See your local city hall or DMV for more information.

Call the Georgia Department of Motor Vehicles, or whatever it is called there, and ask them.


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