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What does loss payee mean on a auto insurance policy?

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2009-02-20 03:57:02
2009-02-20 03:57:02

The loss payee is any entity that has financial interest in the vehicle (usually a financial institution) that notifies the insurance company and the policy holder of that interest in writing. Any entity can be a loss payee, including your father, if he can show financial interest.

The loss payee is usually the finance company that holds title to your vehicle. In the event of significant damage to the vehicle the loss payee needs to sign off on the check from the insurance company for the damage. This usually happens after the damage has been repaired. In the event of a total loss the loss payee will be sent a check for the amount of the loan and anything left over will you to the insured. Hopefully you won't owe more than the car is worth in the event of a total loss.

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