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US Constitution

What does the court's 'jurisdiction' mean?

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Wiki User
December 30, 2009 5:44AM

A court's jurisdiction is determined by the geographical area over which it has control and the subject matter that can be brought before the court.

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only the state courts have the jurisdiction to hear a case

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Courts of limited jurisdiction, courts of general jurisdiction and courts of superior jurisdiction.

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Some federal courts have original jurisdiction; some courts have appellate jurisdiction.

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Special and high level courts have limited jurisdiction while the lowest court in a state has general jurisdiction. Family courts, Immigration Courts, and Bankruptcy courts are examples of courts with limited jurisdiction.

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Juvenile courts are courts of original and special (or limited) jurisdiction.

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Limited jurisdiction courts only have jurisdiction in specific, well-defined areas of law. General jurisdiction courts have general jurisdiction over all subject matters within their local jurisdiction.

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do all courts have the original jurisdiction

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They are part of courts of original jurisdiction.

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Courts have universal jurisdiction.

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The probate courts in Georgia have an appellate jurisdiction. This means that these courts can receive appeals from the lower courts in the Georgian jurisdiction.

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The jurisdiction of courts is applied by local laws. Federal courts have jurisdiction or control over a certain area. The Supreme Court has jurisdiction over the entire nation.

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It refers to any court which is lower in jurisdiction to another couirt. For instance: Courts of original jurisdiction are "inferior" to Appelate Courts. Appelate Courts are "inferior" to the Supreme Court.

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Trial courts (original jurisdiction) and appellate courts (appellate jurisdiction)

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Trial courts (original jurisdiction) and appellate courts (appellate jurisdiction).

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A court of original jurisdiction (trial court - civil or criminal) does not possess appelate jurisdiction. Courts of Appeal and Supreme Courts have appelate jurisdiction over lower courts.

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General Jurisdiction courts are State Courts and Federal District courts (Including appeals and Supreme courts). Specific/Limited Jurisdictional courts are courts which can only hear certain. There are tax courts, bankruptcy courts, patent and copyright court....

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Prisons do not have jurisdiction. Courts do.

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courts of limited jurisdiction.

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Yes, because their jurisdiction is confined to adjudicating local ordnances or statutes that pertain STRICTLY to their own geographic jurisdiction.

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Federal district courts have jurisdiction over cases involving federal law or through diversity jurisdiction.

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Courts of limited jurisdiction are also called "special jurisdiction" courts, because they hear cases of narrowly defined subject matter. Courts that hear a broad variety of criminal and civil cases are called "general jurisdiction" courts.

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they are not felony courts. They are municipal courts

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They are in different places on the hierarchy of jurisdiction. Appellate jurisdiction is higher. Courts with appellate jurisdiction can hear appeals, whereas courts with original jurisdiction can hear cases for the first time.