League of Nations

What effects did the US not joining have on the future of the League of Nations?

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the league of nations was not able to patrol the lands because the American army was not involved

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When the US refused to join the League of Nations this weakened the League of Nations severely. The US government relied on check and balance system as well at this time the US was going through the Great Depression. The League of Nations tried to impose an economical sanction against Italy. When the US found out about it they decided to trade everything Italy had to trade. Once the other countries found out about the decision of the US they realized that the League of Nations was ineffective.

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Membership in the League could draw the United States into future wars. Explanation: There was a clause in the Versailles Treaty (which set up the League) that stated that if Country A is attacked by Country B, and Country A is a member of the League, then all other countries in the League had to help fight Country B. The Senators who opposed joining the League said that this clause would take away Congress's constitutional right to declare war.

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The United States of America chose to not join the league of nations.

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Britain felt the move may have damaged the future of the League of Nation's prestige.

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Avoiding future warsBoundary changesEstablish the League of Nations

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Woodrow Wilson dreamed of a League of Nations that would police the world and prevent future wars.

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The fourteenth point, "a general association of nations", had the purpose of preventing future wars by settling conflicts by mediation by the League of Nations.

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They feared it could lead to future U.S. involvement in European Wars .

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In Wilson's fourteen points he rallied for the need of a League of Nations and felt that without the nation being a part of this league, war would be inevitable in the nation's future. Ultimately, the League of Nations was formed but without the United States.

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US President Woodrow was the 28th US president and served from 1913 to 1921. He was both a graduate and a president of Princeton University. Clearly Wilson wanted the US to join the League of Nations. He believed that as a member, the US was not making itself a participant in any future European wars. The reverse, he believed that a US membership could help prevent future world wars. Wilson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1919 for advocating the creation of the League of Nations. This should make it clear that he favored the US joining the League. He died in 1924 and never saw the clouds of a new war forming.

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There were four main aims of the League of Nations: # To encourage global disarmament # To safeguard national independence and frontiers by upholding the terms of the Treaty of Versailles # To stop war and future conflict # To improve global living and working conditions

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The League Of Nations was created after World War I to prevent future wars.

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The League of Nations was one of President Woodrow Wilson's final points of his 14 points. The League's members nations would help to preserve peace and prevent future wars by pledging to respect and protect one another's territory and political independence. It was a result of the Paris Peace Conference. The outcome was that of noteable success, and failure. The league broke up after world war2

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After World War I the US president at the time thought that the best way to prevent a future war would be to create a League of Nations(our United Nations today). The League of Nations were the leaders of all of the countries involved in the war; France, Britain, America- except Germany. By keeping Germany out of the League and making them pay for the damage caused by the war it would create the German people after living in poverty for years elect Adolf Hitler into office and would later create WWII.

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Via the League of Nations and several other ideas. He was not able to get any of those ideas except the League into the Treaty of Versailles, and even the League was severely crippled in abilities compared to what he wanted it to be.

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The Treaty of Versailles created the League of Nations. This body was intended to mediate future disputes among nations, but it proved to be too weak to be really effective.

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Henry Cabot Lodge; He feared that unqualified support of the League could drag Americans into future European wars by tying the country to unwanted alliances.

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Most Americans wanted to avoid future wars after World War I. This was the reason the US joined the League of Nations.

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Wilson had formulated his famous "Fourteen Points" in 1918, intended to secure peace, arrange for an orderly establishment of new nations to replace the now fallen Axis Empires, and prevent future wars. His fourteenth point was the establishment of a "general association of nations" to enforce the other thirteen points and as a place where future conflicts between nations would be solved by arbitration instead of war. So basically, the League of Nations was Wilson's baby. His efforts to get it off the ground and to make the US join the League earned Wilson a Nobel Peace Prize, but in the end he could not get the US to join, because Congress feared that the League's articles of association (especially Article X) could at a future point draw the US into a war against its will.


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