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Answered 2007-12-09 09:04:03

July 5th 2006 against the Boston Red Sox

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yes but definitely not its most efficient base runner


Yes you can steal first base when you get hit


A base runner can steal a base at any time while he is on base. The only reason they wouldn't give him the steal is if the ball was fouled or he was thrown out by the catcher.


You can't steal first in any league. You can only steal once reaching base.


Yes, depending on what league you are in, you can steal bases.


You can't steal only the computer can steal.


Point at the base you want to steal with the Nunchuk and press A and shake like a madman.


In 2002, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2002, Carl Crawford had 259 at bats, 67 hits, 9 walks, and was hit by the pitch 3 times. He had 1 sacrifice fly. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .290. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2002, Carl Crawford had 259 at bats, and hit 48 singles, 11 doubles, 6 triples, and 2 home runs, for a .371 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2002, Carl Crawford had a .290 On Base Percentage and a .371 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .661. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2002, Carl Crawford had a .290 On Base Percentage and 96 Total Bases for 27.88 Runs Created.


In 2003, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2003, Carl Crawford had 630 at bats, 177 hits, 26 walks, and was hit by the pitch 1 time. He had 3 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .309. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2003, Carl Crawford had 630 at bats, and hit 145 singles, 18 doubles, 9 triples, and 5 home runs, for a .362 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2003, Carl Crawford had a .309 On Base Percentage and a .362 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .671. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2003, Carl Crawford had a .309 On Base Percentage and 228 Total Bases for 70.47 Runs Created.


In 2004, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2004, Carl Crawford had 626 at bats, 185 hits, 35 walks, and was hit by the pitch 1 time. He had 6 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .331. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2004, Carl Crawford had 626 at bats, and hit 129 singles, 26 doubles, 19 triples, and 11 home runs, for a .450 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2004, Carl Crawford had a .331 On Base Percentage and a .450 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .781. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2004, Carl Crawford had a .331 On Base Percentage and 282 Total Bases for 93.30 Runs Created.


In 2005, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2005, Carl Crawford had 644 at bats, 194 hits, 27 walks, and was hit by the pitch 5 times. He had 6 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .331. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2005, Carl Crawford had 644 at bats, and hit 131 singles, 33 doubles, 15 triples, and 15 home runs, for a .469 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2005, Carl Crawford had a .331 On Base Percentage and a .469 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .800. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2005, Carl Crawford had a .331 On Base Percentage and 302 Total Bases for 100.08 Runs Created.


In 2006, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2006, Carl Crawford had 600 at bats, 183 hits, 37 walks, and was hit by the pitch 4 times. He had 2 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .348. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2006, Carl Crawford had 600 at bats, and hit 129 singles, 20 doubles, 16 triples, and 18 home runs, for a .482 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2006, Carl Crawford had a .348 On Base Percentage and a .482 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .830. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2006, Carl Crawford had a .348 On Base Percentage and 289 Total Bases for 100.68 Runs Created.


In 2007, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2007, Carl Crawford had 584 at bats, 184 hits, 32 walks, and was hit by the pitch 5 times. He had 2 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .355. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2007, Carl Crawford had 584 at bats, and hit 127 singles, 37 doubles, 9 triples, and 11 home runs, for a .466 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2007, Carl Crawford had a .355 On Base Percentage and a .466 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .820. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2007, Carl Crawford had a .355 On Base Percentage and 272 Total Bases for 96.49 Runs Created.


In 2008, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2008, Carl Crawford had 443 at bats, 121 hits, 30 walks, and was hit by the pitch 2 times. He had 5 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .319. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2008, Carl Crawford had 443 at bats, and hit 91 singles, 12 doubles, 10 triples, and 8 home runs, for a .400 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2008, Carl Crawford had a .319 On Base Percentage and a .400 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .718. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2008, Carl Crawford had a .319 On Base Percentage and 177 Total Bases for 56.42 Runs Created.


In 2009, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2009, Carl Crawford had 606 at bats, 185 hits, 51 walks, and was hit by the pitch 8 times. He had 5 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .364. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2009, Carl Crawford had 606 at bats, and hit 134 singles, 28 doubles, 8 triples, and 15 home runs, for a .452 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2009, Carl Crawford had a .364 On Base Percentage and a .452 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .816. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2009, Carl Crawford had a .364 On Base Percentage and 274 Total Bases for 99.79 Runs Created.


In 2010, Carl Crawford played for the Tampa Bay Rays. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2010, Carl Crawford had 600 at bats, 184 hits, 46 walks, and was hit by the pitch 3 times. He had 5 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .356. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2010, Carl Crawford had 600 at bats, and hit 122 singles, 30 doubles, 13 triples, and 19 home runs, for a .495 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2010, Carl Crawford had a .356 On Base Percentage and a .495 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .851. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2010, Carl Crawford had a .356 On Base Percentage and 297 Total Bases for 105.81 Runs Created.


In 2011, Carl Crawford played for the Boston Red Sox. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2011, Carl Crawford had 506 at bats, 129 hits, 23 walks, and was hit by the pitch 3 times. He had 4 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .289. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2011, Carl Crawford had 506 at bats, and hit 82 singles, 29 doubles, 7 triples, and 11 home runs, for a .405 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2011, Carl Crawford had a .289 On Base Percentage and a .405 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .694. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2011, Carl Crawford had a .289 On Base Percentage and 205 Total Bases for 59.28 Runs Created.


In 2012, Carl Crawford played for the Boston Red Sox. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2012, Carl Crawford had 117 at bats, 33 hits, 3 walks, and was hit by the pitch 2 times. He had 2 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .306. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2012, Carl Crawford had 117 at bats, and hit 18 singles, 10 doubles, 2 triples, and 3 home runs, for a .479 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2012, Carl Crawford had a .306 On Base Percentage and a .479 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .785. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2012, Carl Crawford had a .306 On Base Percentage and 56 Total Bases for 17.16 Runs Created.


In 2013, Carl Crawford played for the Los Angeles Dodgers. On Base Percentage (OBP) is considered by many to be a better measure of a great hitter than the Batting Average. It is calculated with the formula (Hits + Walks + Hit by Pitch) / (At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Sacrifice Flies). In 2013, Carl Crawford had 435 at bats, 123 hits, 28 walks, and was hit by the pitch 3 times. He had 2 sacrifice flies. That gives him an On Base Percentage of .329. Slugging Percentage (SLG) is a popular measure of a batter's power. It is calculated as (Total Bases) / (At Bats). Another way to look at it is (Singles + 2 x Doubles + 3 x Triples + 4 x Home Runs) / (At Bats). In 2013, Carl Crawford had 435 at bats, and hit 84 singles, 30 doubles, 3 triples, and 6 home runs, for a .407 slugging percentage. Being able to get on base and to hit for power are two of the most important offensive skills in baseball, so the On Base Percentage and Slugging Percentage are often added together. On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic. The best hitters in Major League Baseball can achieve an OPS of .900 or higher. In 2013, Carl Crawford had a .329 On Base Percentage and a .407 Slugging Percentage for an OPS of .736. Runs Created (RC) is a baseball statistic invented by Bill James to estimate the number of runs a hitter contributes to his team. There are a number of formulas used to calculate it. One of the simplest is (On Base Percentage) × (Total Bases). In 2013, Carl Crawford had a .329 On Base Percentage and 177 Total Bases for 58.24 Runs Created.


In fastpitch softball you can either do a straight steal or a delayed steal. A straight steal is when you take off running for the next base as soon as the pitcher releases the ball. A delayed steal is when you lead off the base like you would any other pitch, but a little farther. When the catch throws the ball back to the pitcher you take off running to the next base. This is successful because it confuses the defense, especially if they are not paying attention to you. A lot of times you can steal a base using a delayed steal without them even getting the chance to throw the ball before you get to the base.


no you cant you must have a catcher to steal a base.


A steal is when you run from one base to another when the pitcher is pitching.


How to steal a base in MLB 2k12 wii


No. You don't have to steal. But you do have to advance to the next base if a runner is about to occupy the base you just left from.


if a batter swings and misses and a runner is on base and the runner is stealing then he can steal a base. Not sure what you mean though on a strike swing.



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