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What had Guillermo Camarena to do with color television?

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Answered 2012-07-04 21:19:40

Guillermo Gonzalez Camarena (1917-1965), is a Mexican national from Guadalajara Jalisco. His project was rejected by the Mexican authorities and had to go to the United States.

In 1934 he made his first TV when he was 17 years old, later he patented his color TV in Mexico and the US. He holds patents to various color television systems from 1940, 1942, 1960 and 1962. In 1940 at the age of 22, Guillermo Gonzalez Camarena obtained US Patent #2,296,022 for his Trichromatic system used for color television transmissions.

In August 31, 1946 he sent his first color transmition from his lab in the offices of The Mexican League of Radio Experiments in Lucerna St. #1, in Mexico City. The video signal was transmited in 115 MHz. and the audio in a band of 40 meters. RCA claims they did it in 1946 but Camarena's patent has an earlier month. Also, there are previous attempts or designs.

Guillermo Camarena's work was impressive but some wrongly attribute the first color television to Camarena. However, Scotsman John Logie Baird sent images by a mechanical colour television in 1928, before his electro-mechanical black-and-red system was adopted by the BBC in 1929. This is the first demonstration of color television and precedes Camarena's patents by twelve years.

In 1943, he suggested to the Hankey Postwar TV Commitee that postwar TV should be 1000 lines 3d, color and Black-and-White compatible. The commitee did not think this was possible, but Baird made it work before his death in 1946, a week after he demonstrated the above system, which was the first fully electronic color television in the world. He sent famous actors and moving Cartoons through the air in colour and his images would have been simlar to the HDTV of today. If you search for "John Logie Baird Telechrome" you will be able to see the images reproduced. His system was almost flat screen.

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Yes, he was a Mexican national and inventor of color TV.



Contrary to some claims, he didn't invent color television. That achievement is credited to John Logie Baird when he demonstrated color television in 1928, three years after his public demonstration of black and white television. Camarena patented both in Mexico and the US the first Trichromatic Sequence Field Frequency in 1939. This trichromatic system served as a partial basis for color televisions and is now used by NASA. At the time of his invention, Mr. Guillermo Gonzalez-Camarena was 22 years old.


Guillermo Gonzalez Camarena died in Las Lajas, Veracrus.


Guillermo González Camarena was born on February 17, 1917.


Guillermo González Camarena died on April 18, 1965 at the age of 48.


Guillermo González Camarena died on April 18, 1965 at the age of 48.



"Is you is, or is you not my baby"


Guillermo González Camarena was born on February 17, 1917 and died on April 18, 1965. Guillermo González Camarena would have been 48 years old at the time of death or 98 years old today.


Mexican inventor Guillermo Gonzalez Camarena married Maria Antonieta Becerra Acosta, in 1951. They had two sons: Guillermo and Jose Arturo Gonzalez Becerra.


Guillermo González Camarena was born on February 17, 1917.



He made his invention in 1940. He filled a patent application (U.S. patent 2,296,019) in August 14, 1941 and obtained the patent in September 15, 1942.


There are many famous people in Mexico, in the past and present. One example is Guillermo González Camarena. He was the inventor of the color television. Please see the related link below for more.


the first Gonzalez in Mexico was (Guillermo Gonzalez Camarena)


Carlos Santana, Guillermo Camarena, Richard Gonzales.


Guadalupe VictoriaOctavio PazAlfonso Garcia RoblesGuillermo Gonzalez CamarenaMario J. Molina


See the following link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillermo_Gonz%C3%A1lez_Camarena


George Lopez is a famous Mexican American comic. Guillermo González Camarena is an inventor who in the early 50s invented the color TV. General Mondragon, who invented the assaults rifle, and made the Mexican army capable of having the first fully automatic weapon in the the world. Octavio Paz, Nobel literature award winner in 1990.


Guillermo Gonzalez Camerama invented the color television transmission in Mexico. He first patented his invention patented in the year 1942 in the US.


The first color television was seen in 1928, invented by John Logie Baird who had demonstrated the world's first black and white television just three years earlier in London.Commercial color broadcasts began in 1953 in the US for just a few months. It was a commercial failure as the televisions were not compatible with the existing black and white broadcasts of the time. In 1955, a new color system was introduced and has been in use ever since.However, Mexican engineer Guillermo González Camarena invented an early color television system. He received US patent 2296019 on 15 September 1942 for his "chromscopic adapter for television equipment".González Camarena publicly demonstrated his color television with a transmission on 31 August 1946. The color transmission was broadcast direct from the his laboratory in Mexico City.Hope that helps! ;-)The first serious proposal for colour television was put forward in the 1930s by John Logie Baird, the inventor of the first monochrome television format that was broadcast. Although his proposals were not developed, some of the ideas contained in the proposals were later employed in the first two colour television systems.NTSC was the American system and was broadcast commercially in 1956. PAL was the British version and was not broadcast until 1967. PAL was adopted by most European countries and in fact, Germany used PAL broadcasts before Britain.


Enrique Camarena Robles was born in 1957.


Meghan Camarena goes by Strawburry17, and Meghan-san.



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