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Answered 2009-04-27 10:33:14

Never admit to liability in an accident. Exchange your details and let the insurance companies deal with it.

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It does not matter to an insurance company that the other driver had a suspended license. Liability is determined by the factors of the accident and the evidence put forth. The fact that the other driver had no license does not affect liability or the handling of the claim.


The license status of the other driver has no bearing on your liability. If you were at fault you are still responsible for any damages and injuries. Just report it to your insurance company as you would any other accident.


No, the cosigner has no legal liability in such a case, unless, of course, he or she was the driver of the vehicle at the time of the accident.



The liability, or fault-factor in an accident has nothing to do with whether or not a driver was licensed. The liability in an accident at an uncontrolled intersection can be shared. Several factors go into a case like that & would need to be fully investigated to determine.


Liability insurance for drivers is a requirement in the state of Mississippi. The other party involved in this accident does not have insurance. I do have liability insurance. The accident was not reported although law enforcement was called and an accident report was completed. The other party now wants me to fix her automobile. What are my rights in this situation?


they get in jail for not having a licence and driving.


The at fault driver always has the primary liability for the damages they cause in an accident. (The guy who rams the other guy).


If the other person or driver was at fault as you say, Then all you have to do is file a claim on that persons liability insurance. Hopefully you exchanged information at the scene of the accident.


Most cases you get jailed if the accident is severe. If its not too much you get a ticket for driving without licensed driver. Depends on country to country though


Liability insurance financially protects a driver who is not a fault in an accident by paying for damages. It will protect the driver who is at fault from being sued for damages.


To be a licenced driver in the United States, you must have Liability insurance. To be a licenced driver in the United States, you must have Liability insurance. To be a licenced driver in the United States, you must have Liability insurance. To be a licenced driver in the United States, you must have Liability insurance. To be a licenced driver in the United States, you must have Liability insurance. To be a licenced driver in the United States, you must have Liability insurance. To be a licenced driver in the United States, you must have Liability insurance.



you need to get down to your dmv and fill out a release of liability form.


Typically, the uninsured driver will be cited for it, and your insurance co. is liable for the damages.


When a car is borrowed (with permission) the insurance of the car owner is primary and the insurance of the driver is secondary. Here, the car owner has no coverage to pay for the damage to his/her own car, so the driver's liability insurance would cover the cost of the car. That is assuming the driver has liability insurance, if the driver doesn't have liability insurance, the car owner is stuck (unless he sues the driver).


In the UK the insurance company would not accept liability except under exceptional circumstances


If the vehicle is titled to the parents then little chance of removing liability from mom and dad. If child is titled owner, and has their own auto policy then very likely the parent's can separate their own liability.


If you are a considering ALLSTATE, they will award a safe driver discount if you have carried the same liability coverage and been accident free for the last three years.


What are you asking? Have you had a motor accident? Did the other driver have a suspended licence?


The driver is responsible for whatever goes on in the car. If he/she is distracted he shouldn't be driving but should immediately pull over. If he/she has used the poor judgment to allow an irresponsible person in the car and is subsequently distracted, the driver is still responsible. In the end, no matter what happens, the driver is responsible.


The insurance company is not liable to pay out any damages that were caused in the accident and they cancel your policy. This means that the driver bears the full financial burden for the costs of the accident.


If it was your fault, then regardless of their license status they can still sue you. Their license status only affects their likelihood of getting a citation for driving without a license (and maybe insurance) but it does not affect your liability. You'd still be liable for the accident no matter whether they had a license or not.




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