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What happens in California when a insured car with full coverage hits an uninsured car and totaled it?

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Wiki User
2015-10-19 12:28:17
2015-10-19 12:28:17

There's a good chance the insurance company will deny the claim of the person with the uninsured vehicle, as that vehicle isn't supposed to be on the roadway to begin with.

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The insured drivers uninsured motorist coverage should take care of it. Doesn't matter if property is private or not.

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the uninsured automobile owner rhas to pay out of pocket for the damage

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P.S. The insured driver is found at-fault with witnesses. The uninsured driver is worried if his license will be suspended or facing any penalty for driving the his parent's INSURED car.

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Comprehensive coverage does not apply to the driving of a car. It should be covered.

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Depends on the state laws. Typically driver insurance coverage is extended to any driver of the vehicle insured. Insurance covers the vehicle and any legally licensed driver with permission to operate the vehicle.

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Sorry, you will be out of luck with your insurance company unless you have uninsured motorist property damage coverage on your policy. They only way you can recover is to take the person to court and get a judgement.

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UM (uninsured motorist) coverage is not required in all states that require liability coverage. However, UM is an important coverage in auto insurance because it steps in and pays for your bodily injury (medical expense, lost wages, and pain & suffering) when you are injured by a hit-and-run, uninsured driver, or irresponsible driver who carries low liability coverage on their auto insurance. In another word, UM is a coverage for you and people in your car guarding against the risk of irresponsiblly insured drivers - and there are a lot of them out there.

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"Stacked" refers to uninsured motorist coverage, not to liability or physical damage coverage. In essence, if there are two cars in a household, both with insured motorist coverage, the uninsured motorist limits of the cars can be "stacked"--added together. Naturally, this will only make a difference if the severity of the injury and the clarity of the liability is such as to warrant that size of a payment to the insured. Keep in mind that the assessment of damages by an insurer in an uninsured motorist claim is similar to that done by a liability insurer in a third-party claim. Note also that some states have "anti-stacking" statutes which prohibit the stacking of ininsured motorist limits.

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Vehicles are insured not drivers. If you are qualified and authorized to operate an auto the insurance on it will pay for it and any damage done by it.

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More than likely, you will begin by using your personal medical insurance. Medical expenses and lost wages can possibly be reimbursed through the uninsured motorists coverage.Uninsured/Underinsured coverage laws vary by state. Contact your insurance agent for a full explanation of how this coverage would work on your policy.

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What happens when an insured driver hits someone depends on the state you live in. In a no-fault state you present your claim to your insurance company for payment. In a tort state, you would sue the driver for compensation. If you have uninsured driver coverage, then your insurance company should cover you and/or your vehicle, up to a certain amount. You should check with your insurance company to be sure.

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If you are insured for 'full coverage' or possibly 'uninsured motorist', yes. In a standard liability policy you would probably not be covered.

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UM PD (Uninsured Motorist, Property Damage) may not cover hit and run because this coverage kicks in only when the other party causing the accident is legally uninsured. Since there is no evidence that the other party was legally uninsured then coverage is not provided unless the other hit and run vehicle is discovered and is ruled to be legally uninsured at the time of hit and run accident.

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If the uninsured driver had the permission of the insured driver to operate the vehicle then NOTHING will happen to the uninsured driver. In fact, in this case he or she is not an uninsured driver at all. The insurance follows the vehicle first, the driver second.

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It depends on the concrete contractor. Some of them will be insured while others will be uninsured.

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Uninsured motorist coverage pays damages for bodily injuries when the at-fault driver or owner of a vehicle has no bodily injury liability coverage. It pays an amount up to the amount purchased by the insured, and is generally not a required coverage. In those states that utilize a comparative negligence rule of determining fault for a collision, the amount that the inured party can recover is reduced by the amount of liability attributable to him/her. In that respect, it operates similarly to the evaluation of the injury and damages if the at-fault party did have bodily injury liability coverage. Underinsured motorist coverage serves essentially the same purpose. However, it is triggered when the at-fault party's bodily injury liability coverage is less than the injured party's uninsured motorist coverage. Further, in order to be triggered, the "value" of the injury must exceed the liability coverage of the at-fault party.

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If the accident was caused by the uninsured driver than the uninsured driver is definitely still responsible.

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No direct answer, as this all depends of the level of cover of the insured driver.

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Georgia automobile insurance law states that people who purchase insurance may "stack" - or add the coverage together for each insured vehicle - for uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage.

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Liability covers the other person that you damage. Uninsured and under-insured motorist coverage carries those in your vehicle. Medical payments coverage covers everyone involved regardless of fault.

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Uninsured motorist coverage is a type of first-party auto insurance that compensates one if he/she is injured in a collision due to the negligence of someone else who does not have bodily injury liability coverage. Essentially, it pays the same sort of damages as the at-fault party's bodily injury liability coverage would have paid if it existed. It only pays for compensable bodily injuries--not property damage. In many States, uninsured motorist coverage must be offered in the same amount as one's liability coverage. However, the insured usually has the right to select lower limits or reject it altogether.

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In most states you can purchase under-insured motorist or uninsured motorist coverage that will kick in when the other parties insurance is depleted.


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