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What if an authorized user files bankruptcy does it hurt the card holder?

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2005-09-29 23:52:07
2005-09-29 23:52:07

No, because an AU is not legally responsible for repayment of the debt incurred on the account.

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No, authorized users are not responsible for debt incurred on such an account.

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An authorized user, which is all you are - he is the actual card holder - is not responsible for the bill.

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No. The card holder is responsible for all debt on the credit they extended to him. (You may be responsible to the credit card holder for the debt he incurred for you, if that was your agreement).

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No. An authorized user is not responsible for credit card debt in any situation. Sorry, I failed to mention that the exception is if the "AU" is a spouse and the couple reside in a community property state. What if the authorized user charged on the card? Would he be held responsible for that?

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No, presuming the credit card holder makes all the payments he is supposed to...the user is not liable for the debt on the card, and it is not part of his BK.

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The bankruptcy will appear on their credit if you include this card in your bankruptcy. If you leave the card off the bankruptcy, it will not effect their credit.

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An authorized user on a credit card can be responsible on an account in which the primary card holder passes. The creditor looks at the situation as the authorized card holder was able to make purchases with the account, and should be held liable, even in the event of the primary's death.

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Credit card companies are usually responsive ONLY to the primary card holder. They generally will not speak to, or honor requests from authorized users.

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No but if something happens to the card-holder, like dieing or being arrested, the authorized signer will be made responsible.

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If you are an authorized user then it is not your debt but your mother's debt. Your mother's bankruptcy discharged (wiped out) the debt in question. The collection agency is not allowed to collect from you as, again, it is not your debt. This would not be the case if you were a joint debtor with your mother.

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It depends if the secondary card holder is a "Joint Account Member" or a "Authorized User". The joint account member is responsible for the balance, the authorized user is not.

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Yes. The point of having an authorized user is for that person to be able to use the credit card of the primary card holder. Usually when an authorized user is created, specific limits (amounts, number of transactions, merchant types, etc.) are set up. Sometimes the authorized user is given a card in their own name and that card may even have a different card number so usage may be tracked by the card company and the primary card holder.

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if you are an authorized user on the card then you are responsible for the card too. so yes they can

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Usually all you need is the person's name and their relationship to the account holder. Credit Card issuers have different criteria for adding an authorized person or a second card holder.

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The card holder is under no legal obligation for the card holder to continue making payments after filing for bankruptcy, unless the case is dismissed without a discharge. There are some who believe that they can improve their credit rating by pay off debts that were discharged in a bankruptcy, but I believe there are better methods to reestablish credit after bankruptcy.

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No. The secondary card holder can only discharge his/her own obligation to pay. The primary will staill have to pay.

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No, authorized users are not responsible for an account. Only the actual account holder is responsible for all debt that is incurred.

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No. Authorized Users are NOT liable for the debt, only the PRIMARY on the account is liable.

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No, authorized users of credit cards are not responsible for the repayment of debt incurred regardless of the circumstances. The authorized is not responsible to the credit card company, hence a discharge of the card holders obligation does not relieve them. However, if they had an agreement with the card holder to re-pay them, a debt did exist. Of course, best reflected in a written agreement. That receivable (an asset) of the card holder, had to be reported as such when he went BK, and could have gone to his creditors. In either case, unless the card holder has been continually trying to collect, making demands for payment and such, I suspect in almost any jurisdiction it would be well past the time limit to enforce collection now.

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Certainly, if a credit card had two authorized users but one of them has died, then there is still one authorized user. The account is still open.

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Sometimes credit card charges are not included in bankruptcy. If they are then you will no longer be able to use them.

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No, credit card accounts are not transferrable. It might be possible for the person to become a joint account holder, but that would depend upon the card issuer's lending policy.

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I got married with my husband in December last year. He is planning to apply bankruptcy in Jan. Does bankruptcy effect my green card application? (by the way he got his green card in 2010)

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Short answer:It depends on the bank. Most likely though, no. Long answer:It depends on the bank and if the person asking the credit limit increase is a primary card holder. Most banks or credit card companies won't allow a secondary card holder to increase the credit limit. I just called and checked. The bank my credit card was associated with was MBNA.I am a secondary card holder (my name is on the card, but the primary responsibility to the account is under someone else's name).They told me the primary card holder needs to call in to modify the credit limit.So in my case, the answer is no. An authorized user of the card cannot increase the credit limit without the knowledge of the primary card holder.


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