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Vehicle Titles

What if the names do not have and or or but a slash instead must both parties sign the bill of sale in order to sell a car?

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May 16, 2012 4:37PM

The words "or" or "and/or"used as the conjunction is typically the only time a DMV will accept one signature in the seller section on the title. If it said "and" or had no conjunction at all, it had to have all signatures in order to transfer the title to a new owner. If necessary, you can get a power of attorney (forms are available on DMV/DDS websites) to sign on behalf of an owner indicated by signing "John Doe, POA". I handled title work for 3 yrs in 10 states of the southeast region, & as a dealer, we had to use POA's a lot when applying for lost titles. In cases where 1 of the parties was deceased, I just had to obtain & attach a copy of the certificate, but I always called or went online to that state's DMV to check procedures whenever in question. I don't think the "bill of sale" is as strict b/c it can even be hand-written. (Note: OH, VA, FL were worst to deal with. SC was easiest by far.)

It still depends on the DMV b/c every state is different, they change the rules nearly every year (whether anyone knows or not so I may be out-dated on the lack of use on bills of sale), but they will tell you exactly what to do (haha... typical gov't) or what they require. If you possess the vehicle due to divorce, you may be asked for the judgment papers. The title's signatures always seemed more important to them than a bill of sale, which some people never do. The most important part of the bill of sale (& the reason most people do them) is it can be your proof showing you no longer possess "Make, Model, VIN as of ____ date" so definitely keep a copy in case the buyer never completes the title transfer. (On a personal note... Apparently, that title transfer is what tells "the system" someone else owns it now & telling them it wasn't running isn't a valid excuse for the registration system in GA as to why it wasn't done sooner.)