What is an adjective?

In grammar, an adjective is a word whose main syntactic role is to modify a noun or pronoun, giving more information about the noun or pronoun's definition. Essentially, a 'describing' word.

Here are some examples:

The building is tall.

I met a very old man.

The quick, brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

That's a beautiful dress you are wearing.

There are three kinds of adjectives:

1. Common adjectives are regular adjectives.

blue skies, hairy dog, young man

2. Demonstrative adjectives always answer the question "Which One?".

That, these, this and those are demonstrative adjectives that answer the question "which one" -- I want those shoes. Don't stare at that man. This test was easy.

3. Proper adjectives are always capitalized because they describe a proper noun. Italian is the proper adjective of Italy, Mexican is the proper adjective of Mexico.

There are three comparisons of adjectives:

1. Positive adjectives are the regular form of the main adjective.

Ex: He is a tall man.

2. Comparative adjectives compare two people or things. They usually end with -er.

Ex: She is taller than you.

3. Superlative adjectives compare three or more people or things. They usually end with -est.

Ex: The tallest buildings I have seen were in New York.

There are some comparative and superlative adjectives that are irregular.

I am good at math.

I am not better than you. (comparative)

I promise to be on my best behavior. (superlative)

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*The fourth type of words sometimes defined as adjectives are the articles: the definite article "the" and the indefinite articles "a" and "an." They are sometimes classified with the words called "determiners."

a word or phrase naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.

A word or phrase naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.