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Answered 2011-09-06 23:55:22

"It is raining cats and dogs" IS an idiom. It means raining hard.

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Answered 2020-04-22 05:18:03

Raining cata and dogs

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Under what headword would you find the idiom raining cats dogs?

under what headword would you find the idiom raining cats and dogs?


When you use the expression raining cats and dogs you are using?

"It's raining cats and dogs" is an idiom.


Is 'its raining cats and dogs' an example of personification?

No! 'its raining cats and dogs' is an Idiom.


Is the expression following suit an idiom?

no an idiom would be like "it's raining cats and dogs"


What is that idiom about the cat and dog?

It's raining cats and dogs outside. meaning- it's raining very hard outside. The two brother' fight like cats and dogs. meaning- the two brothers always fight.


Is the sentence It's raining cats and dogs. a cliche?

No, it's an idiom.


What is the type of sentence called when you say its raining cats and dogs?

It's an idiom.


What is an example of an idiom in the best school year ever?

its raining cats and dogs!


Is raining cats and dogs an idiom or adage?

I would say it is more of an idiom since idioms usually don't make sense in their literal form. We know that literal cats and dogs don't fall out of the sky when it is raining hard.


Is raining cats and dogs a hyperbole?

No, hyperbole is an exaggeration. "Raining hard enough to wash the town away" would be hyperbole. "Raining cats and dogs" is an idiom because it makes no sense when you translate it literally.


How do you use the word idiom in a sentence?

That phrase must be an idiom, because I can't understand what it means."It's raining cats and dogs" is an idiom for "it's raining really hard.""I am learning about idioms in English class."Timmy was the apple of my eye".This sentence is an example of an idiom.


Is 'it's raining cats and dogs' a metaphor?

yes and it is also an idiom it is a metaphor because there is no "like" or "as"raining cats and dogs is not a metaphor. it is a simile.actually, I'm pretty sure it's a idiom, a phrase that can not be taken seriously.Yes because it is implying big objects (huge rain drops) are fallingNO ,it is an idiom to say that raining really hard


What Figurative Language is this 'It's Raining Cats and Dogs'?

idiom


What are some idioms about cats?

The most common idiom about cats is "Curiosity killed the cat." A cat has nine lives. It's raining cats and dogs.


Can it really rain cats and dogs?

Of course not! 'I's raining cats and dog!' is an idiom. The precipitation would have to be made of cats and dogs in order for it to rain cats and dogs. Cats and dogs could never make up a cloud because 1) they are too heavy, and 2) they can't evaporate.


How can you finish the simile raining down on us like?

The similes are "raining like an open faucet" or "coming down like Niagara Falls." Another simile is "raining buckets." The familiar idiom is "raining cats and dogs."


What would be classified as an idiom?

An idiom is an expression that has meaning that differs from what one would expect from the actual words. An example would be "the apple of my eye" or "raining cats and dogs."


Sample sentences of allusion?

Its been raining cats and dog all day.


What are some interesting expressions or idioms that people use?

"It's raining cats and dogs!" That's an idiom (you can't take it literally)


Example of idiom sentences?

its raining cat and dogs Every dog has its day Pay through the nose Elbow grease


What is meant by the phrase Dog Vs Cat?

The phrase dog vs cat isn't common but it would mean that they are fighting or battling. However, raining cats and dogs means that it is raining heavily.


Are idioms and metaphors the same?

The answer to that question is no. It's no because a metaphor is an compairson that says one thing is another and an idiom is an expression that says one thaing but means something quite different ( It's raining cats and dogs, which means it's raining heavily). The answer to that question is no. It's no because a metaphor is an compairson that says one thing is another and an idiom is an expression that says one thaing but means something quite different ( It's raining cats and dogs, which means it's raining heavily).


What is the difference between a hyperbole and an idiom?

An idiom is a figurative expression, like "it's raining cats and dogs" (it's not ACTUALLY raining cats and dogs, it's just an expression, so it's figurative), whereas hyperbole is an extreme exaggeration, like "I have a million and one things to do" or "You're so healthy, you're gonna live for a thousand years." Hope that helps :)


How do you know when it is raining cats and dogs?

You know it is raining cats and dogs when you step in a poodle.


What is a sentence on raining cats and dogs?

Since it was raining cats and dogs, we had to cancel our picnic.