English to Scottish Gaelic and Irish (Gaelic)

What is the Irish and Scottish Gaelic for 'wild one'?

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2009-07-03 15:15:26
2009-07-03 15:15:26

In the Irish: scódaí (a wild fellow; person without restraint) also duine fiáin (a wild, lawless, person) In the Scottish Gaelic: ...

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