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What is the alkalinity of water containing 6 and 40mgl of carbonate and bicarbonate ions respectively?


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2007-05-14 19:26:12
2007-05-14 19:26:12

Please clarify the units of concentration of carbonate and bicarbonate. "mgl" is not a unit of concentration (it's not a unit of anything to my knowledge. To answer this question, you need the concentration of both ions. So either provide the amount of both ions AND the amount of water, or just specify the concentration (in unit of molarity, or moles per liter preferably).

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carbonate containing rocks

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phenolphthalein alkalinity is due to hydroxide n carbonate salts in water...nd total alkalinity is mainly due to bicarbonate salts in water..

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You mean alkalinity? Alkalinity measures the ability of a solution to neutralize acids to the equivalence point of carbonate or bicarbonate. The alkalinity is equal to the stoichiometric sum of the bases in solution.

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1. M-Alkalinity (also known as Total Alkalinity) measures the amount of carbonate, bicarbonate and hydroxide present in terms of "ppm as calcium carbonate". ( M-Alkalinity measurement is based on a sulphuric acid titration using a Methyl orange indicator that goes from yellow at a pH of 4.5 to orange at pH of 4.4 at the endpoint.) 2. P-Alkalinity measures the amount of carbonate and hydroxyl alkalinity present in terms of "ppm as calcium carbonate". P-alkalinity is measured down to a pH of 8.3. The M-alkalinity is measured down to a pH of 4.3.

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Alkalinity of water is its acid-neutralizing capacity. It is the sum of all titratable bases. Because the alkalinity of many surface water is primarily a function of carbonate, bicarbonate and hydroxide content, it is taken as an indication of the concentration of these constituent.


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