Electricity and Magnetism
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What is the difference between 240V 50Hz and 120V?

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2015-08-12 02:29:44

I disagree with the part about the "feud" between Edison and

Westinghouse. The feud was between Edison and Tesla and their

financial backers JP Morgan and Westinghouse, respectively. Nicola

Tesla once worked for Thomas Edison and when he began asking

questions about alternating current, Edison did not take his

theories seriously and fired him. Telsa spent a few years

unemployed until he met Westinghouse who believed in Tesla's

theories and began backing his expiriments financially. It was

after Tesla's success in proving his theories that Edison became

aware of the competition and instead of joining forces, decided to

hold public demonstrations as scare tactics for turning the public

against the high voltage needed for alternating current.

As the article states, direct current does not travel very far

so a coal burning plant would be needed to create the steam needed

to turn the generators for creating electric current. Tesla's

alternating current was a much higher voltage which enabled it to

travel greater distances without the need for as many coal burning

plants.

Tesla believed he could send current into the atmosphere to be

drawn by appliances and vehicles for free. He also wanted to

generate enough power to destroy asteroids that orbited too close

to the Earth. Tesla survived Westinghouse and turned to JP Morgan

for financial backing in his later years. He spent his last few

years of his life waiting for a call from JP Morgan that never

came. He died 2 years before the end of World War II and his

notebooks have been confiscated by the US government and have never

been released. The Tesla/Westinghouse tower was dismantled in 1917

during World War I and several attempts have been made to restore

the property. There are ongoing efforts to preserve the grounds and

make a documentary to retell his story.


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