What is the difference between a Durable Power of Attorney and General Power of Attorney?

A general Power of Attorney gives the attorney in fact the authority to perform certain specified acts on behalf of the principal. A General Power of Attorney expires if the principal becomes incapacitated.

A Durable Power of Attorney gives the attorney in fact the authority to perform certain specified acts on behalf of the principal even if that person becomes disabled or legally incapacitated. A Durable Power of Attorney doesn't expire until the death of the principal.

General and Durable POAs grant sweeping powers unless the powers are specifically limited to those powers listed in the document. Limited POAs can also be executed that allow an attorney-in-fact to perform only a certain task on behalf of the principal. For example, a person serving in the military may grant a spouse or attorney a limited POA in order to sell a home.