Asked in
Health
Conditions and Diseases
The Difference Between

What is the difference between a disease and a disorder?

Answer

User Avatar
Wiki User
February 01, 2013 4:18AM

Disease is the older term of the two. Historically, it implies a relative permanence, non-subjectivity, and invariance of symptoms and causation beyond psychiatric illness. Those wishing to avoid negative stigma often prefer "disorder"; in contrast, those wishing to highlight molecular or genetic causation may opt for "disease", e.g. "alcoholism is a disease".

Disorder is a newer term, often used for illnesses where the origin, duration, or physiological basis of an illness is relatively unknown. It is also used where there is a clear underlying cause, yet symptoms have an unusually wide, often subtle, range.

Both are fairly synonymous terms meaning deviations from accepted/"normal" physiological or psychological functioning.

Contrary to popular belief, neither imply particular underlying causes, nor is one more medically accepted than the other. In particular, disease can include but does not require infection (e.g. cardiovascular disease), disorders can be caused by infection (e.g., organ failure in septicemia or viral hepatitis) and doctors use both terms freely.
Disorder -out of order

Disease- not at ease
A disease is a destructive process in a organ or a organism with specific causes and characteristics...A disorder is the upset of normal function of the health.

Answer

Both are fairly synonymous terms meaning deviations from accepted, "normal" physiological or psychological functioning.

Contrary to popular belief, neither imply particular underlying causes, nor is one more medically accepted than the other. In particular, disease does not require infection (e.g. cardiovascular disease), disorders can be caused by infection (epilepsy), and doctors use both freely.

Disease is the older term of the two. Historically, it implies a relative permanence, non-subjectivity, and invariance of symptoms and causation beyond psychiatric illness. Those wishing to avoid negative stigma often prefer "disorder"; in contrast, those wishing to highlight molecular or genetic causation may opt for "disease", e.g. "alcoholism is a disease".

Disorder is a newer term, often used for illnesses where the origin, duration, or physiological basis of an illness is relatively unknown. It is also used where there is a clear underlying cause, yet symptoms have an unusually wide, often subtle, range.
you cannot catch a disorder but u can catch a disease. A disorder is inherited, a disease can be caught by anyone who is not immune to it.
nothing - its just 2 different words that mean the same thing (I have a genetic disease/disorder myself, so I do understand that things can quickly become very confusing with all the info they thrust upon you)