Chemistry

What is the effect of temperature on density of liquid?

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2016-07-14 13:34:32
2016-07-14 13:34:32

That depends on the liquid. For most liquids, as the temperature decreases, the density increases. Water would be an exception since the density of ice is less than that of liquid water.

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Density is affected by the temperature and pressure.


No, a pure liquid at normal temperature has a constant density while the density of a gas depends upon temperature and pressure.


Density increases with a decrease in temperature and decreases with an increase in temperature.


Density is affected by temperature and pressure.


The viscosity of the liquid will increase.


Temperature has no effect upon mass. If you boil a liquid, some of it will evaporate off. This may have the effect of lowering the mass of what remains. But the mass should remain constant. What would change, however, is the volume and density, in accordance with the famous equation: m=vd. Mass is the product of volume and density.


density difference is decreasing when the temperature rises with liquid chlorine.


An increase in temperature results in a decrease in density.


As the temperature increases, the viscosity of the liquid will also increase.


Pressure and Temperature will affect volume and thus also density. However the effect is much smaller than on gases (about 100-1000 times), it is mostly a bit bigger than the effect on solids.


Actually it's the other way around. Temperature will affect density.


Increased salinity and temperature result in an increase in water density.


Temperature: Liquid water is densest at about 4 degrees Celsius. Heat it above or below that and it expands. State: Perhaps a sub-category of temperature, but gaseous water has a much lower density than either ice or liquid water. Pressure: A very small increase in density can be seen by pressurising liquid water, and a very great increase by compressing water vapour. Impurities: The presence of other particles, solvents or living matter in liquid water, ice or vapour has an effect on the sample's density (although this is not really an effect on the water's density by the strictest definition)


Water density changes with temperature and pressure.


Usually a given amount of liquid will grow in volume, meaning it gets less dense. Water between 0 and 4 degrees is an exception.


It is necessary to indicate the temperature when given the density of a liquid because it changes. Some liquids are different densities at different temperatures.


As temperature of liquid water decreases the density remains relatively stable until water changes phase change into solid (crystallization) ice at which point it decreases abruptly by about 10%. Continued cooling has little effect on the density of ice.


At room temperature mercury is




With increasing temperature a substance usually expands but not always so usually the density will decrease.


Specific gravity means the density of something, usually a liquid, compared to that of water. So as water has density 1 g/ml , if another liquid has density say 1.2 g/ml, its specific gravity is said to be 1.2. Temperature will only have an effect due to the expansion coefficient of the liquid, which makes it slightly less dense as temperature rises.


Density of liquid A, relative to liquid B = density of liquid A/density of liquid B. The temperatures and pressures for both liquids must be specified.Often the reference liquid (liquid B) is pure water at one atmosphere and room temperature (20 deg C). In that case, the ratio is also known as specific gravity.Density of liquid A, relative to liquid B = density of liquid A/density of liquid B. The temperatures and pressures for both liquids must be specified.Often the reference liquid (liquid B) is pure water at one atmosphere and room temperature (20 deg C). In that case, the ratio is also known as specific gravity.Density of liquid A, relative to liquid B = density of liquid A/density of liquid B. The temperatures and pressures for both liquids must be specified.Often the reference liquid (liquid B) is pure water at one atmosphere and room temperature (20 deg C). In that case, the ratio is also known as specific gravity.Density of liquid A, relative to liquid B = density of liquid A/density of liquid B. The temperatures and pressures for both liquids must be specified.Often the reference liquid (liquid B) is pure water at one atmosphere and room temperature (20 deg C). In that case, the ratio is also known as specific gravity.


As temperature increases in fluids, density decreases, besides the substance water which has its highest density at its liquid form( ice floats on water).


when water is heated, its density decreases because the molecules move farther away . as we know,upthrust in a liquid is directly propotional to its density ,the upthrust decreases



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