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What is the element named after a European country?

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Answered 2010-11-02 21:00:18

There are a few Francium, Germanium, Polonium

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Dubnium, Db, an element that is named after the city of Dubna, Russia where the Joint institute for Nuclear Research is located. (Not named after a country.)Germanium, Ge, an element that is named after the country of Germany


There is no European capital, but the element "Europium" is named after Europe.


European countries: Francium, Germanium, PoloniumThe continent: EuropiumAsian country: Samarium


Any element is named for a cajun country.


The element polonium was named for the country Poland.


Francium was the element named after a country in Western Europe.


Americium is an element named for a country in the western hemisphere.


The element scandium is named after Scandinavia.


The element, Francium, was named for a country in western Europe, France.


Any man-made element was named after a today country.


It was named after uranus and cockodoodledooium the element of cockodoodledoos


The only country named after an element is Argentina. Elements are Latin, they are not named for the person who discovered them......Latin for silver is argenti or argento.


America, the country it was discovered in. Many elements are named after the country where they were first found.



Americium was named after the United States.


A highly radioactive metal named FRANCIUM was named after France.


It is "Curie" and the element is curium. Polonium is also named after their home country of Poland.



Francium, americium, germanium, and polonium were all named after countries.


Yes, Georgia is a European nation.


This country is Luxembourg and its capital is also named Luxembourg.


Hafnium is named after Hafnia, the Latin name for Copenhagen, where it was discovered.


pedophilium. It has been named after the native country of Marie Curie, the element's discoverer.





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