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Answered 2011-03-27 06:31:08

Positive velocity:

p=vt

(position = velocity*time)

Example: Write the position equation for a person who starts 3 meters behind the reference point and walks with a constant velocity v=6 m/s in the positive direction.

Answer: p=-3+6t

Example: What is the position of the person 5 seconds after the start of motion?

Answer: p=-3+(6x5)=27 m.

Negative velocity:

p=p(0)+vt

p(0) represents the position at time "0" which is also known as the y-intercept or the point where the line crosses the vertical axis. The velocity of the object in motion would be negative.

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