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2010-03-31 16:49:37
2010-03-31 16:49:37

A family history of the disease

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Cancer is a genetic disease. The main characteristic of this disease is it forms uncontrolled growth of the cells and these uncontrolled growth of cells migrate from the origin to various parts of the body.So, A man with prostrate cancer can not give cancer to his wife.


The main risk factors associated with testicular cancer--cryptorchidism, family history of the disease, and being Caucasian--are unavoidable since they are present at birth. In addition, many men diagnosed with the disease have no.


Testicular cancer occurs if a cell divides incorrectly and then passes this mutation on to its daughter cells. Testicles are prone to cancer because they are constantly dividing and constantly making daughter cells, so are prone to making mistakes occasionally. Some of the main risk factors for developing testicular cancer, other than having testicles, is a condition called cryptorchidism. This basically means your testicles didn't descend on their own. The longer they stay in the abdomen, the more chance they can develop into cancer. Other risk factors are having had mumps, having had an inguinal hernia, and a sedentary lifestyle. But the number one cause of testicular cancer is just plain bad luck, with no specific risk factor.


There are two main types of testicular cancer - seminomas and teratomas. These may be called germ cell tumours. Testicular cancer, as it sounds is cancer located in the testicles. Prostate Cancer- The prostate is a small gland found only in men. It is the size of the top of your thumb and surrounds the first part of the tube (urethra) which carries urine from the bladder to the penis. For more straighforward information on testicular and prostate cancers, visit the related links below.


The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. There is no link between vasectomy and testicular cancer. Factors that may increase a man's risk for testicular cancer include:Abnormal testicle developmentHistory of testicular cancerHistory of undescended testicle(s)Klinefelter syndromeOther possible causes include exposure to certain chemicals and HIV infection. A family history of testicular cancer may also increase risk.Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men between the ages of 15 and 35. It can occur in older men, and rarely, in younger boys.White men are more likely than African-American and Asian-American men to develop this type of cancer.There are two main types of testicular cancer: seminomas and nonseminomas. These cancers grow from germ cells, the cells that make sperm.Seminoma: This is a slow-growing form of testicular cancer usually found in men in their 30s and 40s. The cancer is usually just in the testes, but it can spread to the lymph nodes. Seminomas are very sensitive to radiation therapy.Nonseminoma: This more common type of testicular cancer tends to grow more quickly than seminomas. Nonseminoma tumors are often made up of more than one type of cell, and are identified according to these different cell types:Choriocarcinoma (rare)Embryonal carcinomaTeratomaYolk sac tumorA stromal tumor is a rare type of testicular tumor. They are usually not cancerous. The two main types of stromal tumors are Leydig cell tumors and Sertoli cell tumors. Stromal tumors usually occur during childhood.


Testicular cancer occurs most often in males in one of three age groups: boys 10 years old or younger; adult males between the ages of 20 and 40; and men over 60.



No-Shave November (also known as Movember) raised over $42 million for testicular cancer awareness - it was created in 2003 in Melbourne, Australia. Although much of the process is amusing and fun, the main objective is to raise funds for research and awareness of this killer. According to the National Cancer Institute, there have been 8,400 new cases of testicular cancer in 2010.


The exact cause of kidney cancer is unknown but injesting to many chemical preservitives may be a factor.


Most cases (95 percent) of testicular cancer originate in undeveloped cells (germ cells) that produce sperm.These tumors, called germ cell tumors (GCTs), are most common in men between the ages of 20 and 40 and are curable more than 95 percent of the time. There are two main types of GCTs: seminomas and nonseminomas. A third type, called stromal tumors, develops in the supporting tissues of the testicle.Testicular cancer may also develop in the supportive, hormone-producing tissue of the testicles (stroma). This type accounts for 4 percent of testicular cancer in men and 20 percent of cases in boys.Types of stromal tumors include Leydig cell tumors and Sertoli cell tumors.


DefinitionTesticular cancer is cancer that starts in the testicles, the male reproductive glands located in the scrotum.Alternative NamesCancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancerCauses, incidence, and risk factorsThe exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. There is no link between vasectomy and testicular cancer. Factors that may increase a man's risk for testicular cancer include:Abnormal testicle developmentHistory of testicular cancerHistory of undescended testicleKlinefelter syndromeOther possible causes include exposure to certain chemicals and HIV infection. A family history of testicular cancer may also increase risk.Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men between the ages of 15 and 35. It can occur in older men, and rarely, in younger boys.White men are more likely than African-American and Asian-American men to develop this type of cancer.There are two main types of testicular cancer: seminomas and nonseminomas. These cancers grow from germ cells, the cells that make sperm.Seminoma: This is a slow-growing form of testicular cancer usually found in men in their 30s and 40s. The cancer is usually just in the testes, but it can spread to the lymph nodes. Seminomas are very sensitive to radiation therapy.Nonseminoma: This more common type of testicular cancer tends to grow more quickly than seminomas. Nonseminoma tumors are often made up of more than one type of cell, and are identified according to these different cell types:Choriocarcinoma (rare)Embryonal carcinomaTeratomaYolk sac tumorA stromal tumor is a rare type of testicular tumor. They are usually not cancerous. The two main types of stromal tumors are Leydig cell tumorsand Sertoli cell tumors. Stromal tumors usually occur during childhood.SymptomsThere may be no symptoms. Symptoms that may occur can include:Discomfort or pain in the testicle, or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotumDull ache in the back or lower abdomenEnlargement of a testicle or a change in the way it feelsExcess development of breast tissue (gynecomastia), however, this can occur normally in adolescent boys who do not have testicular cancerLump or swelling in either testicleSymptoms in other parts of the body, such as the lungs, abdomen, pelvis, back, or brain, may also occur if the cancer has spread.Signs and testsA physical examination typically reveals a firm lump (mass) in one of the testicles. When the health care provider holds a flashlight up to the scrotum, the light does not pass through the lump.Other tests include:Abdominal and pelvic CT scanBlood tests for tumor markers: alpha fetoprotein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta HCG), and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH)Chest x-rayUltrasound of the scrotumA biopsy of the tissue is usually done after the entire testicle is surgically removed.TreatmentTreatment depends on the:Type of testicular tumorStage of the tumorOnce cancer is found, the first step is to determine the type of cancer cell by examining it under a microscope. The cells can be seminoma, nonseminoma, or both.The next step is to determine how far the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. This is called "staging."Stage I cancer has not spread beyond the testicle.Stage II cancer has spread to lymph nodes in the abdomen.Stage III cancer has spread beyond the lymph nodes (it could be as far as the liver, lungs, or brain).Three types of treatment can be used.Surgical treatment removes the testicle (orchiectomy) and nearby lymph nodes (lymphadenectomy). This is usually performed in the case of both seminoma and nonseminomas.Radiation therapy using high-dose x-rays or other high-energy rays may be used after surgery to prevent the tumor from returning. Radiation therapy is usually only used for treating seminomas.Chemotherapy uses drugs such as cisplatin, bleomycin, and etoposide to kill cancer cells. This treatment has greatly improved survival for patients with both seminomas and nonseminomas.Support GroupsJoining a support group where members share common experiences and problems can often help the stress of illness. Your local branch of the American Cancer Society may have a support group. See: www.cancer.org for more information.Lance Armstrong, a famous cyclist, is a survivor of testicular cancer. His web site -- www.laf.org -- offers support and information for patients with testicular cancer.The National Cancer Institute website also provides further information: www.cancer.govExpectations (prognosis)Testicular cancer is one of the most treatable and curable cancers.The survival rate for men with early-stage seminoma (the least aggressive type of testicular cancer) is greater than 95%. The disease-free survival rate for Stage II and III cancers is slightly lower, depending on the size of the tumor and when treatment is begun.ComplicationsTesticular cancer may spread to other parts of the body. The most common sites include the:AbdomenLungsRetroperitoneal area (the area near the kidneys)SpineComplications of surgery can include:Bleeding and infection after surgeryInfertility (if both testicles are removed)If you are of childbearing age, ask your doctor about methods to save your sperm for use at a later date.Calling your health care providerCall your health care provider if you have symptoms of testicular cancer.PreventionThe United States Preventive Services Tast Force recommends against routine screening for testicular cancer because there is no known effective screening technique.A testicular self-examination (TSE) performed on a monthly basis, however, may help detect such cancer at an early stage before it spreads. Finding it early is important to successful treatment and survival. Young men are sometimes taught how to perform self-exams shortly after puberty.ReferencesEinhorn LH. Testicular cancer. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 210.National Cancer Institute. Testicular cancer treatment PDQ. Updated Jan. 15, 2009.Richie JP, Steele GS. Neoplasms of the testis. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 29.Screening for testicular cancer: update of the evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2004. Accessed March 29, 2009.


Cumulative sun exposure is considered a significant risk factor for non-melanoma skin cancer. High incidence has been noted in individuals with freckles, light hair, and light complexion.


The three main causes of cancer are smoking, diet and exercise. The prevention of cancer is mainly in the hands of the people based on the lifestyle they choose to lead.Answer:Age and genetics are the largest causes of cancer. Lifestyle choices are a lower risk factor. Some people are predisposed to cancer. Age ( and the number of cell replications) reduces the length of the telemeres in the DNA molecules which cause replication errors (cancers) in the cells.



What can be the main limiting factor in the use of RFLP?


Horses are not immune to testicular cancer, so that may be the main reason behind abnormal swelling. If the horse does not seem concerned by it or does not protest when his testicles are handled, it could mean that his sperm production is in overdrive, which can be solved by having him copulate with a mare.


You can find a list of them in the Wikipedia article "Cancer (constellation)", under the section "main stars".



stem cells having oct-4 factor which is responsible for differentiation whereas in cancer cells , cells continously proliferating they never differentiate, nd they also lack oct-4 protein


The main reason that breast cancer is so dangerous is that it can spread throughout the entire body. The lymphatic system could easily spread the cancer to thyroid, uterus, lungs, or anywhere else. It is the metastasizing that is the main concern for breast cancer.


a part of something. "the main factor".


the prinicple means the main. like the prinicple factor would mean the main factor


The main factor limiting the size of cells is the surface area to volume ratio.


My sister is only 36 and has pancreatic cancer - we think lead solder may be a factorThe main recognized risk factors for pancreatic cancer include the following:SmokingAdvanced ageMale sex (The male-to-female ratio of pancreatic cancer is 1.3:1)Chronic pancreatitis - Chronic inflammation of the pancreas, usually from excessive alcohol intake or gallstonesDiabetes mellitusFamily history of pancreatic cancer


Temperature is the principal factor.



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