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Answered 2008-02-23 21:47:59

enturies ago, people believed that a person's image in a mirror was actually a reflection of the person's soul (much like the way Native Americans felt that a photograph stole part of their soul and why they resisted being photographed). Further, this is why vampires can't see themselves in the mirror--they have no soul. Anyway, believing that their soul was in the mirror, breaking a mirror meant that a part of the soul would not be able to reunite with the body. Obviously, without a portion of the soul, a person would be in for some bad luck. The seven years thing comes from the Romans. They believed that a person's health and fortune changed every seven years.

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This superstition dates back to the early Romans who believed a mirror had the power to confiscate part of your soul. Any distortion of your reflection, like breaking a mirror was believed to cause a corruption of your soul.


Technically their is no such thing as bad luck so no. But in superstition terms as far as I know breaking a mirror is 7 years bad luck. So if you broke one RUN THE HECK AWAY FROM IT LIKE USIAN BOLT.


Singular. The plural would be "superstitions".Example:A superstition says that breaking a mirror brings a person seven years of bad luck.She doesn't believe in silly superstitions.


A mirror was once thought to contain one's soul when they look in it. That's where the superstition of 13 years of bad luck (when breaking a mirror) came around. But we know now that what we see in a mirror is just our reflection (from light bouncing off the glass).


Breaking glass is not good luck- it is bad luck. If you have bad luck coming your way, breaking glass will, according to superstition, eliminate it. Breaking glass, without any (bad luck) precursor, will supposedly manifest itself in only bad luck. Speaking in more detail, according to superstition, when one has bad luck coming his or her way, breaking a mirror works as a shield to bad luck. A mirror is a reflective device. When one breaks a mirror, it will reflect the bad luck of a broken mirror. But, when already in the presence of bad luck, it reflects the bad luck in the bad-luck dimension. Bad luck in the bad luck dimension is good luck, which we all obstinately have.


I broke a mirror a few months ago and nothing too bad has happened, nothing that wouldn't usually happen. I was just sad because my grandma got it me and I liked it.


There is a superstition that carrying an acorn can give you long life, which started with the Druids.


It depends who you ask. I, being a science person and not believing in superstition, say that breaking a mirror is not bad luck, unless your parents get mad at you.


Superstition*. 1. Breaking a mirror. 2. Walking under a ladder. 3. Friday the 13th. 4. Magpies. 5. Black Cats


Of course not. It's all superstition. In fact, according to the superstition, throwing salt over your shoulder counteracts other things that bring bad luck supposedly, like breaking a mirror or spilling salt.


It is believed that a mirror is the window to the soul, and when you step in front of one you have put your soul inside. With this "logic" it was believed when you broke the mirror you broke your soul ad it takes seven years to repair it.


Not sure of the reason for the superstition, but have experienced this happening. On the night of the death of a family member a large mirror fell off the wall and smashed. The mirror had been up for 6 years with no movement and the nail and bracket were firmly fixed. The bracket had not broken on the back of the mirror when checked. The mirror had fallen straight down although this was not physically possible without the bracket breaking, which it hadn't - next morning we learnt of the death.


There is no "bad luck" and the superstition of a mirror breaking bringing bad luck comes from the middle ages. So, don't worry about it you haven't gotten bad luck. All of us make our own luck.


The truth is getting bad luck from breaking a mirror is just a superstition. For those who believe in these it is most commonly practiced to take a small amount of salt and throw over your right shoulder.


It is said that seven years' bad luck will result from breaking a mirror.


No. After breaking the mirror, the chemical properties of the remaining pieces are the same as the intact mirror. This is a physical change, not a chemical change.


No. A curse is something allegedly placed on an object, place, or person which creates unwanted consequences, usually if a certain act is carried out. A superstition is much more general in nature, usually surrounding curses, such as "breaking a mirror brings seven years' bad luck." Therefore, some say that a curse falls within the category of superstition.



Any link between the breaking of a mirror and the chemical properties of a product.


It is bad luck to break a mirror. There is no not bad luck in breaking a mirror.


its a superstition - belief that it would cause you bad luck . personally i wouldn't like to try and test the idea out, so my advice is don't try and see if it works .


No breaking a mirror doesn't really give you bad luck it just people being supersticious


Superstition means a belief or notion not based on reason or knowledge, or on an actual connection to a logical or scientific phenomenon. Superstitions are commonly used to explain occurrences that may be random chance, or that have some undiscovered logical explanation. They would include such ancient folklore as breaking a mirror, or black cats, and such modern examples as sports fans wearing "lucky socks" to a game.


Determining the source of a certain superstition is very often difficult. Often these superstitions are ancient and of unknown origin.


The repercussion of breaking the school mirror was that I got suspended.



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