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What is the origin of the bishop's mitre?

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2008-12-12 15:10:38
2008-12-12 15:10:38

In around the year 300, the Roman Catholic church was trying to get pagans to join the Catholic Church and become Catholics. One thing they did to try to make this happen was that they took some pagan traditions and tried to "Christianize" them by making them a part of the Roman Catholic religion and associating them with Christian "saints" instead of pagan gods. There was a pagan god worshipped at that time whose name was Dagon. His symbol was a hat shaped like a fish's mouth with a long piece of cloth that draped down over the back of the wearer, which was painted or embroidered to look like the body of a fish. You can see pictures relating to all of this in the Related Links section below. The Roman Catholic church made this hat a part of the attire of their bishops. At first, they even kept the spots on either side of the "fish head" which represented the fish's eyes. This design has been modified down through the ages and now only subtily resembles the fish head.

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Mitre also spelled Miter. A bishops headwear is called a mitre

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The origin of the word mitre goes back to the old times in Greece. It was then a kind of hat which the people in Greece would wear. They called it the mitre.

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The Bishop headdress is called a mitre.

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The mitre is actually the head gear worn by bishops. The pope is the bishop of Rome.

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A mitre is a headdress worn by bishops on formal occasions. The word is pronounced MY-ter, to rhyme with fighter.

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It represents the 'horns of both testaments'

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It is called a cope. His tall hat is called a mitre.

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There are 100 cm in 1 meter.A 'mitre' is a bishops hat!!

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Bishops and abbots were ranked differently. Bishops were ranked higher and one could tell them apart because the abbots mitre was made from less expensive materials.

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No, besides most bishops do not belong to an Order, they were diocesan priests.

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Norman Ravitch has written: 'Sword and mitre' -- subject(s): Bishops, Church and state

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The bishops are the successors of the 12 Apostles.

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A bishop's mitre is the head-dress worn by a bishop as a symbol of office.Different religions have different shaped mitres. In the Eastern church they often look like turbans, in the Western church they are often tall and deeply cleft.

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Raho-tu (Mitre Peak), Milford Sound, Fiordland, South Island, NZ.

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Arguably, the term mitre or miter is not in Scripture but the development of men. The Jewish priests wore a turban like headdress known as the 'Mitznefet' which had a gold plate on it called the 'Tzitz' which was inscribed with the words 'Holiness of YHWH.' This term however, is often translated into the Greek as 'mitre.' The mitre in a two-sided cone shaped head wear first worn by RC Church bishops and some abbots and them became popular in the Anglican Community, Lutheran, Orthodox and Eastern Christian faiths. Today, one may see this being worn by all Bishops, Cardinals and the Pope of the RC Church, etals.

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Adolfo Mitre has written: 'Mitre en estampas'

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In New Zealand? or Australia? Mitre 10 or Mitre 10 MEGA?

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Do you mean METER, the S.I. unit of measure? About 3 feet 4 inches in old money. Otherwise i don't know the cost of a bishops hat.

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A mitre is an item of headgear.

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A building witha broken pitch (bonnet) roof, also called witches cap, and in france its called a pepper pot, or bishops mitre.

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Mitre The Vlach died in 1907.

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Mitre The Vlach was born in 1873.


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