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What is the origin of the phrase 'Extra Extra Read all about it'?

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2012-02-14 22:25:21
2012-02-14 22:25:21

In the early days of newspapers, when newspapers were the primary method of delivering the news, when something big happened, the publisher would not only publish the normal daily paper, but would also publish an Extra. The newspapers were sold on the street, often by newsboys, who had a stack of papers and would sell them to passersby. When an Extra came out, they would chant "Extra! Extra! Read all about it!" to call attention to the fact that something big has happened, and an Extra paper has been published.

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When newspapers were the only source of spreading news, if something big happened the paper would publish an'extra'. ?æTo draw attention to the big event, newspaper hawkers would yell,"Extra, extra, read all about it!".

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It's not the correct phrase. "fold like a cheap camera" or "all over him like a cheap suit".

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You get your birthday suit instantly when your born (skin) So your only in your birthday suit when your Naked. (shirt and all). (You got your skin on the day your born)

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