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Answered 2009-11-17 00:54:17

The probability that a single coin flip will come up heads is 0.5.

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Answered 2020-05-13 14:03:09

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If it is a fair coin then the probability is 0.5


The probability of heads on the first flip is 50%.The probability of heads on the second flip is 50%.The probability of both is (50% x 50%) = 25% .=========================================Another way to look at it:Two tosses can come up in four different ways:H HH TT HT TOnly one of these . . . H H . . . counts as success.1 out of 4 = 25% .


Experimental probability is the number of times some particular outcome occurred divided by the number of trials conducted. For instance, if you threw a coin ten times and got heads seven times, you could say that the experimental probability of heads was 0.7. Contrast this with theoretical probability, which is the (infinitely) long term probability that something will happen a certain way. The theoretical probability of throwing heads on a fair coin, for instance, is 0.5, but the experimental probability will only come close to that if you conduct a large number of trials.


Assuming: (a) the coin is fair (each side is the same exact weight) (b) the chance of the coin landing in its side is eliminated (c) the coin is not acted on by any forces such as magnetism The chance of the coin displaying heads is 50%, or 1/2.


It is the theory of what might happen, but not actually what happens. In theory, if you spin a coin 100 times, it should come up on heads 50 times, as there is a 1 in 2 chance of you getting heads on each spin. If you actually do spin a coin 100 times, the total of heads is the experimental probability, so what you actually get. That may not be 50. It is likely to be close to 50 though.


The side heads is slightly heavier giving it a greater likely hood of landing on tails.


The probability of 10 heads in a row is (0.5)10 = 0.000977 = 0.0977% .It makes no difference what has come before or what comes after.


The odds of flipping a coin and having it come up heads three times in a row is (1/2)*(1/2)*(1/2)=(1/8) or 12.5% ■


This is correct. For example the probability of tossing a coin so that it comes up heads is 1/2 and the probability that it comes up tails is also 1/2. The probability that it will come up either heads or tails is 1.


The probability is very, very small, because there are no heads marked anywhere on the dice.


If you mean 'at least' 2 heads, the probability is 50%. If you mean exactly 2, the probability is 3/8, or 37.5%. There are 3 independent coin tosses, each of which is equally likely to come up heads or tails. That's a total of 2 * 2 * 2 or 8 possible outcomes (HHH, HHT, HTH, etc.). Of these, 4 include 2 or 3 heads, which is half of 8. Only 3 include exactly 2 heads, so the probability of that is 3/8.


The probability that 2 flipped coins both come up heads is 0.52 or 0.25


The answer depends on "the outcome is heads HOW MANY TIMES!"


This is a good bet to take. Your expected payout is 0.5 each round of the 2 tosses. The possible outcomes from 2 tosses: HT, HH, TT, TH. The probability that heads comes up is 3 in 4 (.75). The probability that heads does not come up is 1 in 4 (.25). Your expected payout is: (2 * .75) + (-4 * .25) = 1.5 - 1 = 0.5


50% Every time you flip a coin, there is a 50% chance it will come up heads and a 50% chance it will come up tails, no matter how many times you have already flipped it, and no matter what the results were of previous flips.


If an event is absolutely certain to happen is then we say the probability of it happening is 1.Complementary events are such that one of the events musthappen. Therefore the probability of one of a set of complementary events occurring is 1.For instance : The probability that a fair coin when tossed will come down showing heads is 1/2, and that it will show tails is also 1/2.The two events are complementary so the probability that the coin toss will result in either a heads or a tails is 1.Similarly, the probability that a die when rolled will show a number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 is 1 as all six events are complementary.


9/16Answer:There are 16 possible outcomes. The criteria (at least two heads) are met if the coins come up in any one of 11 different ways:One way with four heads: HHHHFour ways with three heads: HHHT, HHTH, HTHH, THHHSix ways with two heads: HHTT, HTHT, THHT, THTH, TTHH, HTTHThis would make the probability 11/16


There is a fifty percent chance of the coin landing on "heads" each time it is flipped.However, flipping a coin 20 times virtually guarantees that it will land on "heads" at least once in that twenty times. (99.9999046325684 percent chance)You can see this by considering two coin flips. Here are the possibilities:Heads, heads.Heads, tails.Tails, tails.Tails, heads.You will note in the tossing of the coin twice that while each flip is fifty/fifty, that for the two flip series, there are three ways that it has heads come up at least once, and only one way in which heads does not come up.In other words, while it is a fifty percent chance for heads each time, it is a seventy five percent chance of seeing it be heads once if you are flipping twice.If you wish to know the odds of it not being heads in a twenty time flip, you would multiply .5 times .5 times .5...twenty times total. Or .5 to the twentieth power.That works out to a 99.9999046325684 percent chance of it coming up heads at least once in the twenty times of it being flipped.


Probability determines likely outcomes, not what will happen every time. For instance, if you tossed a coin, the probabilty of coming up heads or tails is even, but there is also a vanishingly small possibility that it wil land on its edge.If you only tossed the coin once, and it came up heads, you could not infer from that result that "if I toss a coin, it will come up heads." The next 10 tosses of the coin might come up heads, but if the experiment is run enough times, a roughly equal number of heads and tails would be observed.This is true of any probability experiment. In biological experiments especially, because we are dealing with the unpredictability of living organisms, a watershed has to be determined, below which we can say with reasonable certainty that the probability of a particular outcome is less than, say 0.5%.If you imagine a bell, the edges flare out, and it rises steeply to a shallow curve at the top. If we place the results of our repeated experiments under that bell, most will fit somewhere under the shallow part of the curve, with the results falling of rapidly to approaching 0 as the values move down to the flare. With just 1 or 2 results, it would be easy to get a distorted picture of a likely outcome.


3/4 The only way a tail doesn't show up is if all heads come up. P(all heads) = (1/2)*(1/2)=1/4 P(at least one tail)=1-P(all heads)=1-(1/4)=3/4


the probability would be 50 to 50 chancesThere's generally a 50% chance it will come up tails, but some coins have heavier designs on one side, so these may be more biased to a head or a tail over the term.If it is a fair coin, then 0.5



1/2 apex It does not matter what each prior flip's result was. Each flip has a probability of 0.5 heads or tails. Coins do not have "memory".


1/16 These are four independent events each with a 1/2 probability. The probability that all four occur (penny and nickels heads and dime and quarter tails) is: 1/2*1/2*1/2*1/2=(1/2)4=1/16.


First work out the probability of the first two coins being heads and then the last being tails. This is 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 which is 1/8 The next step is to find out how many different orders the coins can come in. In this case there are 3 possible orders (HHT, HTH, and THH). Multiply this by the above probability and you get 3/8. Therefore the probability of getting two heads and one tail is 3/8



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