Temperature
Metal and Alloys

What is the resistance of copper wire at 90 degrees Celsius?

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Wiki User
2007-02-15 06:11:03
2007-02-15 06:11:03

I`m Sorry But I`ve Given This A Couple Hours Calculating And I Have Yet To Get An Answer At 90 C Temp. Forgive Me. Depends On The Length Of The Wire And The Guage.

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