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Retinal Detachment

What is vitreous detachment?

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Just sustained an eye injury and was told the answer was no! Sorry


Extreme short sightedness Hypermyopia is Retinal Detachment The retina is attached to the sclera in the back of the eye, and a retinal detachment occurs when it is pulled away from this normal position. The retina, like film in a camera, is responsible for creating the images that one sees. A good picture could not be produced if the film were not in its correct location within the camera, and we lose vision if the retina is not in its proper place within the eye. The retina detaches by separating from the back wall of the eye. When it is removed from its blood supply (the choroid), it will lose nourishment and result in a loss of some vision if not repaired in time. This retinal tear may be caused by trauma or by a vitreous detachment (or "posterior vitreous detachment"). Vitreous detachment, not uncommon in older people, results from the vitreous fluid shrinking and pulling away from the retina. This causes "floaters," which do not damage the retina or vision. Extreme short sightedness Hypermyopia is Retinal Detachment The retina is attached to the sclera in the back of the eye, and a retinal detachment occurs when it is pulled away from this normal position. The retina, like film in a camera, is responsible for creating the images that one sees. A good picture could not be produced if the film were not in its correct location within the camera, and we lose vision if the retina is not in its proper place within the eye. The retina detaches by separating from the back wall of the eye. When it is removed from its blood supply (the choroid), it will lose nourishment and result in a loss of some vision if not repaired in time. This retinal tear may be caused by trauma or by a vitreous detachment (or "posterior vitreous detachment"). Vitreous detachment, not uncommon in older people, results from the vitreous fluid shrinking and pulling away from the retina. This causes "floaters," which do not damage the retina or vision.


* Detachment of the corpus vitreum (VITREOUS BODY) from its normal attachments, especially the retina, due to shrinkage from degenerative or inflammatory conditions, trauma, myopia, or senility. * 379.21 is a specific code that can be used to specify a diagnosis * 379.21 contains 6 index entries * View the ICD-9-CM Volume 1 379.* hierarchy * Vitreous: ** cavitation ** detachment ** liquefaction 379.21 refers to vitreous detachment/cavitation/degeneration. Information source: first hand from my trusted opthalmologist.


A vitrectomy is a surgery performed on the eye. This surgery removes the gel of the eye known as the vitreous humor. It is used to aid in the treatment of eye conditions such as vitreous floaters and retinal detachment.


They vary in cause, but sometimes they are caused by dead blood cells clumping in the vitreous fluid around your eye. Sometimes though they can be caused by retinal detachment. But this is not likely, because retinal detachment is very rare.


Blurred vision, sometime seeing bright lights in the dark, vitreous floaters- large ones. Pain. If you think you have a detached retina, this is an emergency situation.


See a retina specialist to be sure that there are no retinal tears or detachment. If there are none, wait for blood to be re-absorbed. If situation doesn't clear up soon, revisit the retina specialist.


The vitreous is a gel-like fluid which fills most of the eye. As people age, this vitreous becomes more and more liquefied. The vitreous has loose attachments to the retina, and more firm attachments to the optic nerve. At some point in a person's life, the vitreous liquefies enough to shift position in the eye. When this occurs, usually between age 50 and 70, the back edge of the vitreous will pull forward away from the retina, leading to a "vitreous detachment". This is generally a normal process, although it may happen abnormally early in cases of high nearsightedness or trauma. As the vitreous detaches, it tugs on the retina. This is perceived as a flash of light, similar to a lightning flash in the corner of the vision. It may occur especially with eye movement, since the vitreous moves in the eye. Debris pulled off of the optic nerve and retina are then seen as floaters, suspended in the vitreous above the retina. Sometimes this is described as a cobweb, a net, a string, or a fly over the vision.


In an older person Posterior Vitreous Detachment. In middle age the Vitreous Gel inside the eye begins to degenerate and shrink, which can cause a separation of the vitreous gel from the retina at the back of the eye. This normal ageing condition leads to "floaters" or "spiders" in the field of vision. Associated with the condition are flashes of light in the dark. Your vision is otherwise not affected. There is very little, other than wearing dark glasses, that can be done.


"Retinal detachment" is the usual medical term. The condition is most commonly due to a tear in the retina especially in people who are short sighted (myopic). This is a technically a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. The rip allows fluid from the vitreous cavity to pass beneath the retina so the retina progressively separates from the retinal pigment epithelium beneath. Ultimately the entire retina can detach called a total detachment. This is sometimes also called a "funnel detachment" because the retina remains attached to the optic nerve at the back of the eye. There are other types such as "tractional retinal detachment" in patients with severe diabetic eye disease or "exudative detachments" due to inflammatory conditions.


The vase was vitreous. :p duuuhhh idiot.


the entire detachment was killed or wounded.....................


The vitreous cavity also known as the Vitreous Humor isA jellylike transparent fluid fills the inner chamber of the eye. This fluid is called the vitreous humour and it is contained in a thin membranous sac called the hyaloid membrane (not shown). The fluid of the vitreous humour has a refractive index of 1.337.


The "Vitreous Jelly" or what you may mean, the vitreous humor, is clear gel (which I assume can be likened to glass), that is between the retina and lens of the human eye.


the FAIRIES! the FAIRIES! > > > > >>>>> Yeah, maybe if you're tripping but in all seriousness, flashing lights or sparkleberries, or stars or whatever you want to call them, could be a sign of vitreous or retinal detachment. You should go see an ophthalmologist as soon as you can so they can monitor the situation. If it's vitreous, that means you are at risk for a retinal tear or detachment. When THAT happens, you will notice a "dark curtain" coming over your vision. Don't panic, I see this all the time @ the clinic I work for and it is treatable. You won't go blind as long as you get medical attention soon. Hope this helps!


with a clear gel called vitreous humor with the vitreous humor


The vitreous humor helps keep the retina in place


A vitreous luster resembles glass. It may or may not be metallic.


How about: vital vitamin vitality vitreous (as in, vitreous humor), vitiate


Well if you ask me , the luster of ice is vitreous ...... well if you're thinking what vitreous is ... Vitreous is ......1.relating to ,resembling, or having the nature glass ; glassy .2.obtained or made from glass3.Of or relating to the vitreous humor.


Untreated retinal detachment can cause blindness.


The duration of Detachment - film - is 1.67 hours.


Vitreous Humour is a jelly like substance filling the vitreous chamber of the eye ball. This is the space behind the lens and back of the eye ball.


HUMAN EYES[VITREOUS HUMAR HUMAN EYES[VITREOUS HUMAR




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