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What kind of molecule is CH3COONa?


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Answered 2009-04-13 15:04:20

It is the formula for the chemical compound Sodium Ethanoate (the chemical name). It's called Sodium Acetate in everyday terms.

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They are chemical compounds


ITS: CH3COONa --> CH3COO- + Na+ Or if its CH3COONa . 3H2O --> CH3COONa + 3H2O


CH3COONa +H2O ------> CH3COO- (aq) +Na+ (aq) + H2O


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It is sodium acetate anhydrous.


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A polar solvent. Like dissolves like.


It is usually written NaC2H3O2 and is Sodium Acetate.


Neither. Sodium acetate is a salt.



The net ionic equation for naoh plus ch3cooh to ch3coona is as follows: CH3COOH + OH- ==> CH3COO- + H2O


There is no reaction between them: They only 'could exchange' the H+ and Na+ ions but the products are identical to the reactants.CH3COOH + CH3COONa --> CH3COONa + CH3COOH


CH3COONa plus H2O plus CO2 has 5 Hydrogen, 3 carbon, 5 oxygen, and 1 Sodium


WITHIN the molecule: covalent bonding. OUTSIDE the molecule: hydrogen bonding, mainly.


There is no such thing. A positive molecule will only be attracted to a negative molecule.




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