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Answered 2011-09-13 10:26:57

A brown widow spider native to Florida but have been found in Arizona near moist, water areas.

could be an illegal alien, sheriff Arpaio, or Obama. definitely not a spider.

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A brown spider with a black cross on its belly may be a common house or garden spider. It may also be one of the many varieties of orb weavers.


i think a brown recluse does....those are scary >.



A Southern Black Widow or Brown Widow


One zebra has stripes on its back. One has it on its back and belly. and one has brown stripes not black.


The spider you're referring to may possibly be a relative of the black widow, known as the brown widow.


I'm almost certain you're referring to a wolf spider.



Look up a Brown Widow spider. that might be what you are looking for.


A brown spider with white spots on its belly is a orb weaver spider. These spiders are known to be in gardens.


It may be the brown widow, which is a relative to the black widow. Thank you!




Calico cat? No. A tabby cat usually has brown and black stripes, although some have gray and black or orange and black stripes.



A brown spider with yellow stripes is a Saint Andrew's Cross. They are a non-aggressive breed of spiders, and their bite is non-toxic to humans.


Most people will say it's a black widow, but it can also be a brown widow.


It is called the black widow spider (Referred to as the black widow), it is a spider with a strong neurotoxin. With respect to the body size, they have longer legs and smaller abdomen. They are usually dark brown, has yellow stripes, and a yellow hourglass spot.


It depends on the breed of the zebra but dominently they have black stripes


A spider that is brown with a large yellow belly might be a brown widow. Almost all spiders roll into a ball for protection. This spider could also be a garden orb.


if it is a small spider then I'm geussing that it is a wolf spider (shudder) or more commonly known as a garden spider maybe?


Many, many snakes are brown and black, as this coloration is useful for camouflage. The answer to this question also depends on what you would consider a "stripe". The ball python is a fairly common pet snake that has brown and black markings. As do some color strains of corn snakes and garter snakes. The rat snake can be brown with black stripes, but I've never seen one with the reverse. The black-striped snake is so named because, go figure, it is black and striped. Its stripes are brown. Indigo snakes are almost entirely black, but can have brownish markings around their head and chin. The mud snake and crayfish snake are black with a brown belly which can, from the side, look like a single brown stripe stretching the entire length of the snake. The hognose is also black and brown, though again it's more brown with black stripes than black with brown stripes. The night snake can have wither brown stripes or black stripes, but not both. The common kingsnake and the plainbelly water snakes are actually brown with large, black spots, but if you only look quickly they can appear black with many thin, brown stripes. Most other water snakes also have brown and black markings. The whipsnake is a gray with brown stripes. The longnose snake and mountain patchnose snake are black with brown stripes. As is the Western Ribbon snake, though it can also have red stripes in the mix. The copperhead and rattlesnake can also both have black and brown markings, that in some cases will certainly appear mostly black with brown stripes. This is not, by any means, a complete list of snakes that fit the description you gave. If you could post a picture you would, I'm sure, get a more helpful response.



Spiders come in a variety of colors that include black and brown. Some spiders have stripes of black and yellow. There are spiders that are shades of orange, green, and yellow.



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