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What options are there for worn down teeth?

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2006-04-03 15:46:15
2006-04-03 15:46:15

usually only crowns/caps or posts.

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Red kangaroos' teeth tend to get worn down from the tough vegetation they eat. Instead of continuously growing, once a kangaroo's front teeth are worn down completely, they fall out, and the back teeth move forwards to take the place of the worn front teeth.

No, a Guinea Pigs teeth do not stop growing. Guinea Pig's teeth are constantly being worn down, so they need to keep growing. If their teeth are not being worn down, they can grow into their jaw.

Yes, kangaroos are grazing animals and they need strong teeth for chewing the grass they eat. The teeth of the kangaroo are continuously being worn down by the tough grasses they eat. Instead of continuously growing, once a kangaroo's front teeth are worn down completely, they fall out, and the back teeth move forwards to take the place of the worn front teeth. Kangaroos have four such pairs of chewing teeth.

no. Rabbits have teeth that continuously grow throughout their lifetime and are worn down by eating

Yes, unless worn down or broken.

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Her incisors will be worn down right to the gums, making it diffict for her to bite off blades of grass.

Yes - very much so. Kangaroos are grazing animals and they need strong teeth for chewing the grass they eat. The teeth of the kangaroo are continuously being worn down by the tough grasses they eat. Instead of continuously growing, once a kangaroo's front teeth are worn down completely, they fall out, and the back teeth move forwards to take the place of the worn front teeth. Kangaroos have four such pairs of chewing teeth. Monkeys are not grazing animals, and they do not feed on coarse vegetation, so their teeth are sharper and narrower than kangaroos' teeth.

They gnaw because their teeth never stop growing, and they need to be worn down.

Most marsupials have sharp teeth at the very front, whether they are herbivores (like wombats and koalas) or carnivores (like Tasmanian devils and quolls). Some then have grinding molars further back. Kangaroos' teeth are different again. Kangaroos are grazing animals and they need strong teeth for chewing the grass they eat. The teeth of the kangaroo are continuously being worn down by the tough grasses they eat. Instead of continuously growing, once a kangaroo's front teeth are worn down completely, they fall out, and the back teeth move forwards to take the place of the worn front teeth. Kangaroos have four such pairs of chewing teeth.

The process of a horses teeth constantly 'growing' is commonly called eruption. A horses teeth don't really 'grow' once they become adults, it just seems like they do. As a horse wears down its teeth more of the tooth erupts over the gum line to replace what has been worn down. Typically once a horse reaches it's twenties or thirties it will have worn down all of it's teeth and the eruption process stops.

Any toys that are non toxic, and keeps their teeth worn down.

His teeth had become worn down in his sleep over time due to bruxism.

Kangaroos' teeth are unlike other animals, and they do not have "canine" teeth. They begin life with four pairs of teeth. As their teeth are worn down by the coarse grasses and vegetation they eat, the teeth at the front fall out, and the ones from the back move forwards to replace them.

The four main front teeth (incisors) are somewhat like a beavers teeth. The two top incisors get worn down when the rabbit chews. The teeth rub against each other to keep them even and balanced.

Herbivore teeth get worn down by constantly being used to cut and chew plants, especially grasses. The teeth must grow or the animal would eventually lose its ability to feed.

Rodent's teeth: they never stop growing and need to be constantly worn down, otherwise they can harm their gums and inner cheek. They have two longer top and bottom teeth, which are sharper than the rest.

yes it will eventually break off the enamel on your teeth making them sensitive

One way to tell the approximate age of a border collie is by their teeth. If they have all their adult teeth and the teeth are bright white, the dog is probably approximately one to two years old. As a dog ages, their teeth become stained and worn. It is an estimate on the age of a dog because a dog who aggressively chews may have worn down teeth when only a couple of years old.

Rabbits have big teeth so they can chew through wood, somewhat like a beaver. (i say they're all the better to EAT YOU WITH!!!:) Rabbits are monophydants which means their teeth grow continually and are worn down as he eats.

The negative effects of clenching teeth include worn down biting surfaces, pain in the jaw joints and cracked and loosening teeth. This condition is known as Bruxism and steps should be taken to correct the problem.

The teeth are made of a calcium compound which wears down over time. The worn teeth eventually fall out and are replaced up to six times during the lifespan of the animal. The tusks are modified incisors and are made of ivory.

Kangaroos are quite different to other grass eaters. By its nature and structure, grass is abrasive on an animal's teeth. Many grazing animals have molars with open roots which grow continuously throughout the animal's life, so the teeth never wear down completely. Kangaroos do not have this open root structure. Instead, they have four pairs of cheek teeth on both sides, and only their front pairs of teeth are worn by chewing the tough grass. When these front teeth are worn down to the roots, they fall out and the next pair of teeth move forward to replace them. By the time the animal reaches the age of fifteen or twenty years, it is down to its last pair of teeth.

A cow doesn't usually loose her teeth; she mostly grings them right down to the gums before she looses them. Depending on her diet and where she lives, a cow most commonly has to be culled when she is between the ages of 15 to 20+ years because her teeth are worn down too much.

Blue sharks do have teeth. Since they are carnivore's and prey on fish and other sea animals they have many teeth used to capture these hard to catch prey. Like other sharks the blue shark has many rows of teeth that fall out as they get worn down, only to be replaced by a new set of teeth.


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