Literature and Language
William Shakespeare
Romeo and Juliet

What point does the prince make to the Montague and capulet families?

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2015-06-25 17:28:14
2015-06-25 17:28:14

"Don't fight any more."

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He says they have to lay off the fighting or he'll have them put to death.



I think that in one point in the story, a fight between the two houses caused some innocent citizens to die, so the Prince finally said that next time there was a fight, the people responsible would be put to death.


There's a brawl which turns into a riot. Everyone on stage gets drawn in: first the nobodys like Samson and Abram, then Benvolio and Tybalt, then Montague and Capulet. Finally the Prince steps in and stops it, but the sense of hatred does not dissipate at all. It is an underlying tension from this point forward in the play.


That is a bit more complicated than it seems. In the opening of Act I Scene i, both Gregory and Samson are listed as "of the house of Capulet". They discuss hating the Montaguesand how they will fight them. However, there is no mention that they are related to the Capuletsby blood and are most likely servants since they reference their "master" numerous times. So yes they are on the Capulet "team" but probably not Capuletsthemselves.There is another possible point of confusion however: When Gregory and Sampson are arguing with Abram (assumed to be of the house of Montague) they decide to finally start fighting because Gregory says, "Here comes my master's kinsmen." (I,i,52) What's confusing is that Benvolio,Romeo's cousin and of the house of Montague, has just entered. So it seems you have a Capulet claiming one of his master's kinsmen (Benvolio)is coming so they will have some back up, but Benvoliowould not have fought on their side because he is a Montague.It can be assumed, however, that Gregory's line actually refers to Tybalt, Juliet's cousin and a Capulet, who enters soon after Benvolioand that Gregory did not see Benvolio.


Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory was created in 1995.


The Prince says "See what a scourge is laid upon your hate, that heaven finds means to kill your joys with love." The Prince does not say that they caused the deaths but that the deaths are a punishment from God for their evil feud. He also says that he himself has been punished for being lenient by the deaths of Mercutio and Paris. "All are punished!" It's not clear that Capulet wholly buys this line but he is deeply hurt at this point not so much by the death of his daughter and only child who he mourns deeply and tragically in Act IV when he thinks her to be dead ("Oh child, oh child! My soul and not my child! Dead art thou--alack, my child is dead, and with my child my joys are buried.") but with the knowledge that she was married, and married to a good man, "a virtuous and well-governed youth" as he called him in Act I. He is thinking about Romeo and that Montague is suffering the same deep and tragic sorrow for the loss of his only child. His sympathy makes him call his former enemy "brother Montague" because they are brothers in sorrow. Then you can tell that he is thinking about the fact that their children were married and that Romeo was his son-in-law by talking about the "jointure", the money that should be settled by a husband on his bride. Perhaps he senses that the only jointure that would have pleased Juliet is peace between the families, so he offers that, to honour her.


The cast of Prince Henry at West Point - 1902 includes: Prince Heinrich of Prussia as himself


Prince Henry at West Point - 1902 was released on: USA: March 1902


Good question. Here are some possible answers. 1. Romeo is virtually independent of his parents. They don't know where he is half the time. Juliet, on the other hand, is a prisoner in her own house, only allowed to leave to go to church. Because Juliet is always at home, we see her family more. 2. More girls were forced into arranged marriages than guys. (It did happen the other way--see Shakespeare's play All's Well that Ends Well) The forced arranged marriage is an important plot point as it forces Juliet to the desperate recourse of faking her own death. It makes sense that we should see the family dynamics behind the forced marriage. 3. Likewise, the faked death has to bring on reactions in the people who find it, which has to be the Capulet family. 4. The killing of Tybalt increases the rift between the families. That wouldn't have happened if he had been a Montague. He had to be a Capulet (or quasi-Capulet) for the Capulets to get exercised about his death. Again, we focus on the Capulets. 5. It's a long enough play as it is. We only have time to look in depth at one of the two families.



The death of Tybalt. Up until that point, the plan was to present the parents with a fait accompli of a consummated marriage, which the parents would likely accept, whatever their feelings about the other family. But the death of Tybalt meant that Romeo personally would suffer the anger of Mrs. Capulet particularly and Capulet as well to a certain extent, not because of what some other Montague had done, but because of what he himself had done, and it would be difficult if not impossible to reconcile the Capulets to having him as a son-in-law. They would sooner send out a hit man after him. (Mrs. C plans to do this anyway).


The turning point of the Great Depression is when people had no where to live and support their families.


Prince Henry - of Prussia Arriving at West Point 1902 was released on: USA: March 1902


Fresh Point - 1997 Step Families 1-77 was released on: USA: 5 September 1999


Union General Henry Prince graduated from West Point in 1835. Among the 56 graduating cadets that year, Prince was ranked 30th. Prince is most famous for his part in the Battle of Gettysburg. There his commanding officer, General Meade criticized Prince for failing to properly engage the retreating Army of Northern Virginia.


Departure point: Prince Rupert, CanadaDestination point: Edmonton, CanadaEstimated flight duration: 1 hour, 43 minutes




This is a very difficult question. Many different answers arise and so it is up to you to chose whichever you think is most accurate. The most popular answer seems to be the death of Tybalt, because it is a turning point in the play. This is definitely a major turning point because the death of Tybalt serves as the beginning to all of Romeo and Juliet's problems. However, I personally believe that this is, rather than the climax, the beginning of the rising action. Others will say that the climax is when the Nurse finds Juliet (supposedly) dead. After her feigned death, the mood of the story is changed from happy (Juliet and Romeo being happy together, with hopeful looks toward their future; Capulet, Lady Capulet, and Paris looking forward to the wedding) to very melancholy (Romeo's misunderstanding about Juliet's feigned death, Lord and Lady Capulet's sadness at their dead daughter, the death of Lady Montague, the deaths of many others). I personally believe that the true climax of the story is when Romeo and Juliet die. This is the final point of major action in the story, which often defines a climax. After this point, the story merely concludes, with a summary of the story from Friar Lawrence and Romeo's letter (read by the Prince), as well as our learning that Lady Montague also died and that the Montagues and Capulets are going to resolve their feud because of the large amount of casualties that have been suffered.


Insofar as any of the characters discuss things before they do them, words lead to actions. For example, Paris and Capulet talk about the possibility of marriage between Paris and Juliet. Capulet eventually agrees. It has all been talk so far. Then Juliet says she'd rather not marry Paris. At this point the talk leads to actions, namely Capulet getting violent with Juliet.


It was intended to point a finger at the Medici family. His rivals at the time.


Prince Heinrich of Prussia has: Played himself in "Prince Henry (of Prussia) Reviewing the Cadets at West Point" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry of Germany" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry (of Prussia) Arriving at West Point" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry at Philadelphia" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry at West Point" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry (of Prussia) Visiting Cambridge, Mass. and Harvard University" in 1902. Played himself in "Kaiser Wilhelm and Emperor Franz Josef, and Prince Henry Riding Horseback" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry (of Prussia) Arriving in Washington and Visiting the German Embassy" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry (of Prussia) at Niagara Falls" in 1902. Played himself in "The Visit of the Duke of Connaught C-I-C Forces in Ireland and Prince Henry of Prussia to Cork Exhibition" in 1902. Played himself in "Prince Henry at Washington" in 1903.


Orby Head, the highest point in Prince Edward Island National Park, has an elevation of 6 meters.


Yes, he could theoretically decline his title as King. At that point, Prince William is next in line to the throne.



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