History of the United States
Politics and Government
US Constitution

What powers do states and the federal government share?

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2017-12-08 03:48:10
2017-12-08 03:48:10

The United States Constitution provided that states and the federal government would share certain powers. These powers are called Concurrent Powers. Examples of such powers are the power to tax and borrow money; the power of eminent domain (to take property for the public good); the power to define crimes and the power to enact laws and establish courts. States may also exercise (share) any power that the Constitution does not specifically reserve for the federal government.
Concurrent powers are shared by the state and federal governments .
Shared, or "concurrent" powers include:

  • Setting up courts
  • Creating and collecting taxes
  • Building highways
  • Borrowing money
  • Making and enforcing laws
  • Chartering banks and corporations
  • Spending money for the betterment of the general welfare
  • Taking (condemning) private property with just compensation

The concurrent powers.
  • Collect taxes
  • Build roads
  • Borrow money
  • Establish courts
  • Make and enforce laws
  • Charter banks and corporations
  • Spend money for the general welfare
  • Take private property for public purposes, with just compensation

They cannot:

  • Build or establish post offices
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