Custody

What rights does a non custodial parent have if there is no court order?

123

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2012-10-11 15:08:23
2012-10-11 15:08:23

It depends on marital status. If married, parents have equal parental rights. If unmarried, the mother has custody and the father must establish his paternity legally. Once established he can request joint custody and visitations.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


No, not without a court order.No, not without a court order.No, not without a court order.No, not without a court order.

No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.No. They would need to request a court order. A non-custodial parent has no right to force anything on the custodial parent.

The non-custodial parent should petition the court immediately to change the custody order.The non-custodial parent should petition the court immediately to change the custody order.The non-custodial parent should petition the court immediately to change the custody order.The non-custodial parent should petition the court immediately to change the custody order.

If you have court ordered visitation rights the custodial parent is in contempt of a court order. You must return to court immediately and file a motion for contempt. A custodial parent who refuses to obey a visitation order can eventually lose custody. If there is no visitation order in place then you must request one from the court.

They can for a vacation. They cannot move permanently without authority from the court. The other parent still has parental rights and visitation rights. The court has jurisdiction. The custodial parent needs the non-custodial's parent's consent to move the child out of state as well as a court approval through a modification of the visitation order. The custodial parent cannot interfere with the non-custodial parents access to the child.They can for a vacation. They cannot move permanently without authority from the court. The other parent still has parental rights and visitation rights. The court has jurisdiction. The custodial parent needs the non-custodial's parent's consent to move the child out of state as well as a court approval through a modification of the visitation order. The custodial parent cannot interfere with the non-custodial parents access to the child.They can for a vacation. They cannot move permanently without authority from the court. The other parent still has parental rights and visitation rights. The court has jurisdiction. The custodial parent needs the non-custodial's parent's consent to move the child out of state as well as a court approval through a modification of the visitation order. The custodial parent cannot interfere with the non-custodial parents access to the child.They can for a vacation. They cannot move permanently without authority from the court. The other parent still has parental rights and visitation rights. The court has jurisdiction. The custodial parent needs the non-custodial's parent's consent to move the child out of state as well as a court approval through a modification of the visitation order. The custodial parent cannot interfere with the non-custodial parents access to the child.

Of course. The non-custodial parent has a right to know where their child is living unless their parental rights have been terminated by a court order.

The custodial parent must take the matter before the court by filing a motion for contempt of a court order. The court may impose sanctions but the custodial parent must stay on top of the situation.The custodial parent must take the matter before the court by filing a motion for contempt of a court order. The court may impose sanctions but the custodial parent must stay on top of the situation.The custodial parent must take the matter before the court by filing a motion for contempt of a court order. The court may impose sanctions but the custodial parent must stay on top of the situation.The custodial parent must take the matter before the court by filing a motion for contempt of a court order. The court may impose sanctions but the custodial parent must stay on top of the situation.

There is no need for a law to prevent such behavior. The non-custodial parent has no right to prevent the child from participating in activities without the backing of a court order. the custodial parent should consult an advocate at the court or a private attorney to expand their knowledge of their rights.There is no need for a law to prevent such behavior. The non-custodial parent has no right to prevent the child from participating in activities without the backing of a court order. the custodial parent should consult an advocate at the court or a private attorney to expand their knowledge of their rights.There is no need for a law to prevent such behavior. The non-custodial parent has no right to prevent the child from participating in activities without the backing of a court order. the custodial parent should consult an advocate at the court or a private attorney to expand their knowledge of their rights.There is no need for a law to prevent such behavior. The non-custodial parent has no right to prevent the child from participating in activities without the backing of a court order. the custodial parent should consult an advocate at the court or a private attorney to expand their knowledge of their rights.

The custodial parent must return to court and file a motion for contempt of a court order against the non-custodial parent.

If the visitation schedule says overnight visitation, yes. The visitation schedule is a court order. If the custodial parent violates the order the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt.

Generally, arrears are owed to the custodial parent unless that is changed by a court order.Generally, arrears are owed to the custodial parent unless that is changed by a court order.Generally, arrears are owed to the custodial parent unless that is changed by a court order.Generally, arrears are owed to the custodial parent unless that is changed by a court order.

The custodial parent cannot deny visitation of the non-custodial parent if there is a court order in place. Only the court can rescind visitation privileges or terminate parental rights. If there is no court ordered visitation the custodial parent has the right to use their discretion. If however, the non-custodial parent decides to file for visitation rights; the refusal for visitation will not be looked upon favorably by the court unless there are acceptable reasons for it having been done.

Absolutely not. The custodial parent is obligated by law to obey the visitation order. If they don't the non-custodial should return to court and file a motion for contempt of a court order. Repeated violations may result in the custodial parent losing custody.Absolutely not. The custodial parent is obligated by law to obey the visitation order. If they don't the non-custodial should return to court and file a motion for contempt of a court order. Repeated violations may result in the custodial parent losing custody.Absolutely not. The custodial parent is obligated by law to obey the visitation order. If they don't the non-custodial should return to court and file a motion for contempt of a court order. Repeated violations may result in the custodial parent losing custody.Absolutely not. The custodial parent is obligated by law to obey the visitation order. If they don't the non-custodial should return to court and file a motion for contempt of a court order. Repeated violations may result in the custodial parent losing custody.

The answer depends on whether you are the custodial parent or the non-custodial parent.Denial of visitation rights by the custodial parent can result in a contempt of court order and if that parent continues to violate the visitation order they could eventually lose custody.If the non-custodial parent does not follow the visitation schedule either by failure to pick the child up at the appointed times of dropping by at unscheduled times, the custodial parent can return to court and ask that the visitation schedule be modified.It creates a difficult and stressful situation for the child and the parent who is not violating the order when the order isn't followed.

Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.

If there is a legal order in place outlining custody and visitation rights for the non-custodial parent, the non-custodial parent may file an action against the custodial parent for contempt of court by failing to abide by that order. If the contempt continues, the judge may order a modification to custody giving it to the non-custodial parent, depending. If no legal order is in place, now would be a good time to file for one to protect the rights of everyone involved.

In some states the parent can contact the department of family and children's services to help enforce the visitation order in most states he or she will need to return to court and request the order be enforced. The custodial parent who denies visitation when there is a court order in affect can be charged with contempt and may be placing their custodial rights in jeopardy depending upon the circumstances.

Since a Child Support Order is a Court Order the Court can change their Order as they see fit, regardless of what the Non-custodial parent, or the custodial parent think. The Court does not need your "consent" to issue an order. The Non-custodial and custodial parent would receive notice of a Court hearing or administrative hearing prior to any changes being made to the Court's Order, so it is important to show up to the hearing! This is not to be construed as legal advice, always seek the advise of an attorney to preserve your rights.

No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.No. The existing visitation order must be followed or the custodial parent could lose custody. If necessary, the custodial parent must return to court and seek a modification of the order.

The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.The non-custodial parent cannot force any conditions or requirements on the custodial parent. If they think there is a serious need for counseling and the custodial parent disagrees they can request a court order but they need to provide evidence.

If you're the father and the custodial parent is not abiding by the terms of the court order saying that you had visitation rights, then contact the court. You personally can't enforce them, but the court darn sure can; the custodial parent may be found in contempt of court if she is failing to abide by the terms.If you're the custodial parent ... court orders very seldom say that a non-custodial parent must visit the child even if he or she doesn't want to, so there's not really much you can do.

In Massachusetts: If there is a child support order (issued by the court) then the 'non-custodial' parent will have to pay child support to the 'custodial' parent until the child support order is modified by the court. Even if the kids actually live with the 'non-custodial' parent, that parent still has to follow the current court orders, no matter how unfair. If the kids are living with the non-custodial parent, though, it shouldn't be too difficult to go into court and get the child support order changed.

No they can not. The key here is the "custodial parent" . You may be able to go to court. But if you keep the child and you are not the custodial parent and there is a court order saying the other parent is the custodial parent, all that person has to do is call the police, and the non custodial parent would have to give up the child.

You should take the issue to court and request a court order stating that the custodial parent has the right to claim the child on their tax return.You should take the issue to court and request a court order stating that the custodial parent has the right to claim the child on their tax return.You should take the issue to court and request a court order stating that the custodial parent has the right to claim the child on their tax return.You should take the issue to court and request a court order stating that the custodial parent has the right to claim the child on their tax return.


Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.