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Answered 2016-12-02 22:51:18

In early 1942, the British were making early plans for bombing raids on the German home front. Lord Cherwell unveiled the best plan that the British air force could create at that time in the war. It was determined that until war supply factories could be found and targeted, the best approach, until better plans could be developed was to bomb working class towns in order to do the most damage to German morale. At the time, this plan was only revealed to British cabinet members. Later, when the US was able to participate in bombing strategies, the locations of other sites would be discussed.

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Hitler realized that an invasion of Britain could succeed if Germany gained control of the air. In the beginning of August 1940, the Luftwaffe -the German air force- launched a major offensive attack. The British fought back wit determination. They were supported by an effective radar system that gave them early warning of German attacks. In September, in retaliation for a British attack on Berlin, Hitler ordered a shift in strategy. Instead of bombing military bases, the Luftwaffe began massive bombing of British cities. Hitler hoped in this way he would be able to break British morale. Instead, because military targets were not being hit, the British were able to rebuild their air strength. Soon, the British air force was conflicting major losses on Luftwaffe bombing. At the end of September, Hitler postponed the invasion of Britain indefinitely.


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