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When is w a vowel?

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2011-02-16 19:02:20
2011-02-16 19:02:20
Answer"W" is a vowel in the very few words borrowed from Welsh. Two of these are "cwm", which is a special type of valley, and "cwr", which is a type of train tracks made from single long rails rather than a bunch of short ones put together.

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AnswerThe above is not the only way in which w is used as a vowel. W is also used in diphthongs at the end of words, ie., how, row, low, bow, etc. In these instances, it is serving the purpose of a vowel. The letters l, m, n, and r, can also be used in this manner, ie., bottle, bottom, button, and butter.

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2020-10-08 00:21:20
2020-10-08 00:21:20

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Related Questions


W is always a consonant and never a vowel.


No, but in words ending in "W", it often sounds like a vowel.


How about the word "vowel" itself? Or the word "vow"?


W is a vowel sometimes, as is Y. There are words in Welsh that use only a W. An example would be the word tow. Without the W the O would not be long. This illustrates that the W is forming a diphthong, which mirrors the use of the letter U from which it developed. After a vowel, W is considered as a vowel, with an "au, oo, or oh" sound. Before a vowel it is considered a consonant, with its "wh" sound.


W is a vowel sometimes, as is Y. There are words in Welsh that use only a W. An example would be the word tow. Without the W the O would not be long. This illustrates that the W is forming a diphthong, which mirrors the use of the letter U from which it developed. After a vowel, W is considered as a vowel, with an "au, oo, or oh" sound. Before a vowel it is considered a consonant, with its "wh" sound.


W is a consonant because it is not a vowel.


No. Contrary to what some people say, "W" is never a vowel in the English language.


Y is considered as a semi-vowel. Like W.


'W' cannot be a vowel, the only interchangeable letter is 'y'. Here in the word 'two' 'w' is a silent consonant.


W is a vowel in certain English diphthongs, for example bow ( ba-oo ) or cow ( ca-oo ).


In English words, W is a vowel in the diphthongs aw, ow and ew .There may be some Welsh words borrowed directly into English, most notably crwth ("crooth"), in which W is the only vowel.


In native English words W is always a consonant. But in some words borrowed from languages where W is a vowel (there are many) W can be a vowel in English. Cwm: a shallow valley Crwth : a medieval fiddle Twp : feebleminded (all borrowings from Welsh).


There is no word in English without a vowel. The vowels are aeiou and sometimes y and w, which are called semi-vowels. The Welsh word crwth is sometimes cited as an English word having no vowel, but of course the w is a vowel in that word, representing the sound "oo."The letter 'w' is never a vowel in English (though it is in Welsh). The sound that the written letter represents can be both a vowel and a consonant, but when it occurs as a vowel sound it is always represented by a written vowel, not by a written 'w'.


no. its only a e i o u and SOMETIMES y. sorry [: Actually, w can be a vowel. The full mnemonic is "A, E, I, O, U, and sometimes Y and W". A word commonly used to illustrate w being a vowel is crwth.


In the English language the only letter that can be considered a consonant or a vowel is the letter Y. The letter W is a consonant.


Yes. The vowels are aeiou and sometimes y and w. Y is not a vowel. In some words it substitutes a vowel (like "why,") but it's not considered a vowel. In "city," the only vowel is I.


"Y" is only sometimes a vowel, for example in thyme, rhyme, or synthesis. For the use of "W" as a vowel, see the related question link below.


#include<locale> #include<iostream> #include<string> bool is_vowel(const char c) { static const std::string vowels = "AEIOU"; return( vowels.find(toupper(c))<vowels.size() ); } int main() { std::string alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"; for(size_t i=0; i<alphabet.size(); ++i) { std::cout<<'\''<<alphabet[i]<<"\' is "; if( !is_vowel( alphabet[i] )) std::cout<<"not "; std::cout<<"a vowel."<<std::endl; } } Output: 'a' is a vowel. 'b' is not a vowel. 'c' is not a vowel. 'd' is not a vowel. 'e' is a vowel. 'f' is not a vowel. 'g' is not a vowel. 'h' is not a vowel. 'i' is a vowel. 'j' is not a vowel. 'k' is not a vowel. 'l' is not a vowel. 'm' is not a vowel. 'n' is not a vowel. 'o' is a vowel. 'p' is not a vowel. 'q' is not a vowel. 'r' is not a vowel. 's' is not a vowel. 't' is not a vowel. 'u' is a vowel. 'v' is not a vowel. 'w' is not a vowel. 'x' is not a vowel. 'y' is not a vowel. 'z' is not a vowel. 'A' is a vowel. 'B' is not a vowel. 'C' is not a vowel. 'D' is not a vowel. 'E' is a vowel. 'F' is not a vowel. 'G' is not a vowel. 'H' is not a vowel. 'I' is a vowel. 'J' is not a vowel. 'K' is not a vowel. 'L' is not a vowel. 'M' is not a vowel. 'N' is not a vowel. 'O' is a vowel. 'P' is not a vowel. 'Q' is not a vowel. 'R' is not a vowel. 'S' is not a vowel. 'T' is not a vowel. 'U' is a vowel. 'V' is not a vowel. 'W' is not a vowel. 'X' is not a vowel. 'Y' is not a vowel. 'Z' is not a vowel.


actually there is two others, y and w can be used as a vowel also


'Wife' has a long vowel sound: w-eye-f.


The standard vowels are A, E, I , O, and U. The semi-vowels are Y and W. The Y takes the place of a vowel, typically I as in the words by, myth, and rhythm. The W forms the diphthong sound ou/ow in words such as how and cow, where the O loses its O sound. In other ow words, the W can be considered silent (blow, show). (In Welsh, the W is a semi-vowel with the sound of a long U or OO.)


The Welsh word crwth, borrowed directly without Anglicised spelling, sometimes appears in English dictionaries. In proper English, w is a vowel only when combined with another vowel, as a diphthong such as how or in words like yawn.


The vowel sound for "one" is a short U, with a W preceding. (wun)


A, E, I, O, U, and sometimes Y In grade school, I learned it as A, E, I, O, U, and sometimes Y and W We learned that "w" was a vowel in the diphthong "ow" (e.g., cow, clown, frown) and in the diphthong "aw" (e.g., hawk, claw, fawn), but that it could also stand alone as a vowel in some words, although the teacher did not give an example of that. The word crwth (an instrument) is a word that uses "w" as its only vowel. == Remove w because w isn't a vowel


The letter 'w' is often used like a vowel, sometimes more obviously than others:two (obvious!)sew (pronounced so-oo)



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